Wrexham Supporters Trust

BBC News Report: Wrexham FC in row with disabled supporters’ group

The following article appears on BBC News website. 

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A row has broken out between a football club and its disabled supporters’ group.

Wrexham FC said the club’s Disabled Supporters Association (DSA) went “on strike” after it had a ticket and an on-pitch presentation request refused.

The DSA usually assigns the spaces for wheelchair users but the club said it had to do this itself at a recent match and is now running it itself.

The DSA said the issue was about the presentation.

Wrexham Supporters Trust, which runs the club, spoke out following a “growing social media storm”.

The row centres around the club refusing a request for complimentary match tickets and a pitch presentation for to the DSA after being recognised for an award at a fans’ diversity ceremony in London.

The DSA is part of Allies in Access group and it wanted a similar Midlands-based association to visit for the Ebbsfleet match on 12 October and have the presentation on the pitch.

The club said it was unable to help due to “competition rules” but an offer remained open for a pitch-side photo call on a non-match day as a compromise.

However, following the disagreement and “strike”, the club’s statement said the DSA’s “presence will not be required on the platform… for the remainder of the season”.

“Our disabled supporters rely on the provision of services and we have to ensure they continue to receive a high-quality service without the potential for any possible disruption as it really makes a difference to their match day experience,” the statement said.

“This has been a difficult decision to take by Wrexham AFC but we must ensure the services for some of our most vulnerable supporters are never placed in jeopardy and taking these services in house is the most sensible solution at this time.”

The DSA said the “sour point” was the club’s response to refusing the presentation.

The DSA claimed it had been told that was because it was not a club-related matter.

A statement added: “Rightly or wrongly, this was taken very negatively by members of the Wrexham DSA committee who took it in the context of ‘despite the hours we give to the club on a match day, we are not club related’.”

It said that left some committee members frustrated and said they would not be on duty for the game against Ebbsfleet.

“I won’t belong to a club that does not accept me as a member”

I have been a supporter of Wrexham AFC for 35 years. I have ploughed tens of thousands of pounds into the club I love. My relationship with the football club has been the one consistent relationship in my life and  outlasted failed relations with the opposite sex. I believed I would be Wrexham til I die, but unfortunately things don’t always turn out the way you expect them to.

The way the Disabled Supporters Association has been treated over the past few years is nothing short of a disgrace. The DSA is run by a team of dedicated committee members who represent the best interests of football supporters from all walks of life. They have done a sterling job in trying to maintain a community feel around a heartless carcass of a club.

The official club statement below describes the club’s biased view, but there are two sides to every story. I have been busy with the #SaveWILG campaign so have not been able to give this divide my full attention. I only know that instead of welcoming disabled supporters, Wrexham AFC are driving them away and totally failing in their moral obligations to the community at large.

Nothing has happened with regard to the resolution that myself and Ian Parry made to the Wrexham Supporters Trust (WST) AGM back in 2018. To read the full story about this, click here.

Because I no longer feel welcomed at the Racecourse, it is with a heavy heart that I have decided to cancel my monthly direct debit to the WST. I cannot justify giving any more money to an organisation that clearly does not value my presence at games. Last season, the club actually used a hashtag at the end of their tweets – #WeAreOneTeam. This is an absolute joke and I encourage everyone with an ounce of solidarity and common decency to listen to their hearts before deciding whether or not to return to the Racecourse while the current regime is in control.

Wrexham fans might be interested in knowing about the eBay auctions that I will be listing soon of all the merchandise I have collected since we have been under the ownership of the WST. I have to find a way of getting some compensation. I will notify readers when these auctions go live.

I will still be writing my book about the history of the club. The volume will only focus on our time in the Football League when it was worth attending the Racecourse. I can’t recall the last time I actually got excited at a Wrexham game. Sadly, I just don’t have the time to waste anymore. The median age of death for someone with Friedreich’s Ataxia is 35. I am now 42 and determined to squeeze the most out of life while I can.

Cheers WST, you may have done me a favour…

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WST STATEMENT | STATEMENT REGARDING WREXHAM DSA & VIEWING PLATFORM

The Wrexham Supporters Trust need to respond to a growing social media storm regarding the club taking over the stewarding of the viewing platform at the Racecourse from the Wrexham Disabled Supporters Association. It is important that the situation is clarified and people understand the background to the decision.

Before the game vs Ebbsfleet

In the run up to the home fixture vs Ebbsfleet United, Wrexham AFC received a request from the DSA for complimentary tickets and a presentation on the pitch before our game against St Mirren Colts on Saturday, 12th October for a group called the ‘Allies in Access’.

Unfortunately we were unable to facilitate this request on this occasion as rules of the competition do not allow for complimentary tickets to be given away, apart from those stipulated by the competition.

The presentation on the pitch was for the ‘Allies in Access’ group who had won an award recently at the ‘Fans for diversity’ awards, which Wrexham DSA attended. The Allies in Access are a group based in the West Midlands, who represent their clubs, Walsall, Wolves, West Brom, Birmingham and Aston Villa. The group support their own clubs with disability requirements.

Unfortunately, Wrexham AFC were further unable to facilitate this request due to the tunnel area being restricted from 2pm onwards on matchday. This operation is standard practice at all of our home games.

As a compromise, the WST and Wrexham AFC offered the DSA to invite the ‘Allies in Access’ group for a pitchside photograph on a non-match day, an offer that is still open.

Upon receiving the news, the DSA contacted the club on Friday, 27th September to inform us they were going on ‘strike’ and would not be attending the Ebbsfleet game the following day in protest.

The DSA also informed our stadium manager and our DLO they were not prepared to supply the names of the supporters attending the platform and intended not to run their Audio Descriptive Commentary (ADC).

This left Wrexham AFC in a difficult position, with no alternative other than to steward the platform ourselves, so some of our most vulnerable supporters received the match day services they have become accustomed to.

Wrexham AFC contacted the suppliers of the ADC to see if we could make alternative arrangements to allow our supporters who use the service an option to have the commentary on the day. As a contingency measure we made plans for the commentators to sit next to the users of the commentary service.

The day of the game vs Ebbsfleet

Thankfully a DSA committee member contacted the club on the Saturday morning to say that they were prepared to organise the ADC, as Wrexham AFC did not have access to the equipment required. Wrexham AFC are grateful to the DSA committee member for providing the service, as we know how valuable it is to those supporters who use the ADC.

At midday in the run up to the game the DSA having previously informed us they were withholding the names of who was due to be on the platform, thankfully changed their stance and provided the names of the platform users to the club.

Unfortunately, Wrexham AFC were unable to provide any assistance with the car parking at Glyndwr University. Wrexham AFC do not have an organising relationship for activities in the car park area, which are usually carried out by the DSA in conjunction with the owners of the car park.

Following the Ebbsfleet Fixture

An email was sent to the DSA the following Thursday, as we had not been informed if they were intending to resume their role providing stewarding on the platform for the fixture vs Harrogate Town. So that alternative arrangements could be arranged in time, a deadline was put in place, if the deadline wasn’t met, the club would need seek to make alternative arrangements, as 12pm is the cut off for making professional staffing arrangements.

The DSA replied to an email after the deadline and as such Wrexham AFC operations had already acted to put alternative arrangements into place to ensure the platform could be used by our supporters, both on Tuesday and for the rest of the season, so we can be certain to keep continuity of service to fans.

The decision was not taken lightly and given the situation, Kerry Evans, Wrexham AFC Disability Liaison Officer has agreed to take over the organisation of the platform alongside her other roles at the club, which will not be affected by her taking the extra work on.

The DSA kindly agreed to deliver the ADC at the Ebbsfleet game and have been invited to continue to deliver the service at the Racecourse Ground on match days. Should the DSA feel unable to provide the receivers to our supporters who use the service, Wrexham AFC will look to source more receivers to ensure ADC can continue.

There appears to be some confusion among supporters regarding the DSA and disability projects that are being run by Wrexham AFC through Kerry Evans.

Wrexham AFC projects include:

  • The Autism Friendly area and quiet room
  • Accessible away travel scheme
  • Kerry has been instrumental in Wrexham AFC and The Racecourse being the first professional football club in Wales to be granted Autism Friendly status
  • Dementia friendly status for the ground
  • Autism friendly football sessions
  • Anti-bullying workshops in schools
  • Representing Wrexham AFC in her official capacity at many community events in the area. Kerry will continue to provide our supporters with all the usual along with these extra tasks.

The DSA’s role on matchdays has been:

  • Stewarding the viewing plaform
  • Handing out receivers for the ADC
  • Working with the WSA on the Blue badge car parking
  • Supporting Wrexham DSA members

In the spirit of openness and transparency, below is a copy of the email sent to the DSA informing them of the decision by Wrexham AFC.

We would prefer to resolve these issues in a face to face meeting and by reasonable discussion, but when individuals resort to social media it is important that the full facts are brought to the attention of our supporters. That is why we have taken the unusual step of making this statement.

Ultimately all of us want to provide the best facilities for all our fans and our DLO in particular has worked tirelessly to help bring that about. In fairness to her (and our other volunteers) it is important that the full facts are aired in response to what others have chosen to publish.

“Thanks for your reply Andy.

Unfortunately as the DSA did not reply until after the 12pm deadline, which was required by us, Wrexham AFC had no alternative but to ensure the services were available for some of our most vulnerable of supporters.

As such, the DSA presence will not be required on the platform for Tuesday evening at Wrexham AFC and for the remainder of the season. Our disabled supporters rely on the provision of services and we have to ensure they continue to receive a high quality service without the potential for any possible disruption as it really makes a difference to their match day experience.

Wrexham AFC will continue to strive for excellence with regards to inclusion and diversity as anyone would expect as a minimum. This has been a difficult decision to take by Wrexham AFC but we must ensure the services for some of our most vulnerable supporters are never placed in jeopardy and taking these services in house is the most sensible solution at this time. Wrexham AFC will strive to improve on the services currently offered which I am sure you would welcome.

I would like to add our gratitude to Darren for facilitating the ADC on Saturday. The continuation of this service is a high priority for Wrexham AFC and if you can commit and guarantee to providing the service you would be welcomed to do so on behalf of the football club. Should you be unable to guarantee providing the service to our supporters who gain an enhanced match day service, Wrexham AFC will have no option other than to source alternative arrangements. Feedback from the supporters who use the ADC has been so positive, we know how much they value the service and will take all steps necessary to ensure its continuation.

With regards to any meeting, Wrexham AFC were unaware of any issue until the request one made by the DSA for tickets and pitch presentation for the St Mirren Colts game, unfortunately this was unable to be facilitated. Alternative arrangements were offered for the allies in access group to attend the ground on a non match day to have a pitch side presentation but we have not heard back regarding the offer which still stands. Should you wish to email a request with an agenda for items you wish to discuss at a meeting we would look to meet you at a convenient time and date in the near future.

Wrexham AFC would like to thank you for your past presence on the viewing platform and hope we can continue working together in providing services to some of our most vulnerable supporters in the future.”

Issued jointly by: Wrexham AFC Operations and Wrexham Supporters Trust Governing Body.

Kick in the Teeth…

The following statement has been published on the Wrexham Supporters Trust website and as you can imagine I am far from happy for a number of reasons.

Basically everything that I wrote in my previous blog, entitled Making a Stand , still holds true as nothing that we requested in our original resolution has been fulfilled with the building of a hugely unpopular second platform that is light years away from the inclusive nature of disabled facilities recommended by Level Playing Field and similar organisations.

I would also question why the authors of the original resolution, or the DSA itself, were not regularly consulted as the WST undertook their binding duty to fulfil the wishes of club owners. Yet again I feel that the disabled fan base have been let down and fobbed off by a self-interested committee who have little interest in providing equal access for all.

A new acquaintance of mine has summed up the dire situation at the Racecourse perfectly with the following quote:

I have been a Wrexham supporter for 40 years. There have been high points, low points but consistently throughout that 40 years I have felt a sense of belonging. An albeit small part of a common bond that cements me not only to Wrexham Football Club, but my town. I have no doubt that every Wrexham fan feels exactly the same way. That feeling every match day when we get together with our friends and enjoy that unity in supporting the club we ALL love.

Now imagine for a moment that the people who we have entrusted to oversee our joint investment in OUR club feel that not every fan should enjoy that feeling of being included within the Wrexham AFC family. Imagine if you will, that on matchday you are told that you cannot be amongst your friends, that you cannot feel part of that ground swell of anticipation as the team press forward, imagine being told for instance that you cannot feel part of that, that you have to forsake that because you have a disability!

Would any fan without a disability feel happy feeling that in some way that they were being segregated? I guess not, imagine turning up on matchday with your mates and being singled out as not being included. Imagine that this was said to you by a supporters trust whose very purpose was to promote an inclusive community club. Just imagine that, a community fan owned football club who cannot grasp who their community is. An “inclusive” football club who fail to include. Not really the dream that the WST sold us, is it?

Every trust member, every Wrexham AFC fan needs to be aware of what is going on, and every WST board member needs to be aware of their responsibilities. This is not a jolly for them, they have to be held accountable for every decision they make and we all have to keep making them aware of that.

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The following statement has been published on the Wrexham Supporters Trust website:

Following a meeting with representatives of Wrexham Supporters Trust, Wrexham Association Football Club board, Wrexham AFC Disability Liaison Officer and Wrexham Disabled Supporters Association on Wednesday evening we can inform members work on construction of the new viewing platform will begin in early September.

The new viewing platform will be available for use by both home and away supporters as the location is suitable for either set of supporters to feel a part of the atmosphere with their fellow fans. The platform will be constructed on the land between the Tech End and BKoncepts stand in the stadium. Due to its placement giving a front on view of the pitch, the viewing platform will be suitable for use by supporters with neck and spinal injuries as recommended by Level Playing Field ( https://www.levelplayingfield.org.uk). Representatives of WST and Wrexham Association Football Club have been in regular dialogue with Level Playing Field and they have offered their support for the platform location.

The construction project will also include a refurbishment of the existing toilet blocks in that area to ensure they will be suitable to be used by all supporters accessing the platform. Supporters catering needs will mirror those currently used at Platform 1 in the Hays Travel Stand.

Wrexham Supporters Trust and Wrexham Football Club are committed to improving facilities for all supporters and are currently working on numerous projects to improve the match day experience. We will continue to keep members updated of the progress and would like to take this opportunity to thank our members for their patience in the building of the platform. We are sure every member and supporter of Wrexham AFC is looking forward to seeing the platform in use.

Making a Stand

Twelve months ago, Ian Parry and myself – both life-long supporters of Wrexham AFC – wrote the following resolution to be put to the Wrexham Supporters Trust AGM:

It has come to our attention that Wrexham AFC, whether through a lack of finance, vision or compassion, have let the proposed building of further wheelchair viewing platforms become an infuriatingly long drawn out and laborious, unfinished, process.

Since the opening of the inaugural platform  in 2015 by Lord Faulkner of Worcester, Wrexham AFC has had an abundance of positive nationwide publicity regarding this new facility for disabled fans. However, instead of striding forward and consolidating this with additional facilities, the club has rested on its laurels and appears content to sit back and accept the plaudits for achieving the implementation of a single solitary wheelchair viewing platform.

We believe that rather than this be the minimum requirement it should have indeed been a catalyst for further development and an opportunity to show many other clubs how to accommodate and welcome disabled supporters.

The official capacity of My Racecourse is quoted as 10,500 and according to the recently published “Green Guide” it states that “there should be 100 wheelchair spaces in a venue of 10,000 or more seats” At the moment My Racecourse has 6 designated wheelchair spaces on the wheelchair viewing platform, whilst the other “designated” wheelchair spaces are in fact seats designed for able bodied supporters where wheelchair users are expected to comfortably position themselves; more often with a carer squeezing in alongside.

Many disabled Wrexham fans attend matches in all weather conditions and deserve at least the basic right of shelter. Additional and improved disabled viewing facilities would show that the club does indeed care, recognises and appreciates their dedicated support.

We note that the club originally applied for funding for 3 platforms at £18,000 each in 2014/15.

Our Resolution is this:-

That WST agree:

  1. To have designated wheelchair and carer bays at the front of the Hays Travel stand.
  2. That the club take action as soon as possible on further platforms as soon as funding is in place, and the plans have been passed by Wrexham Council and by the Safety Officer.
  3. That these new facilities are not tied in to, or dependent upon, any other stadium redevelopments.
  4. That the club meets minimum standards of accessibility at the earliest possible opportunity.

 

It is time for the 2019 AGM, which takes place on 27th June. You would have expected much progress to have been made to enable wheelchair spectators such as myself and Ian, to enjoy an afternoon at the Racecourse with fellow fans. Unfortunately, next to no progress has been made and we are still watching 80% of games at pitch-level at the front of the stand. This section does not provide adequate cover, so we are often at the mercy of the elements. This pitch-side area has not even been specifically designated as we called for last year.

I can’t speak for Ian, but I have had enough of being treated like a second-class citizen. It is no fun watching a poor standard of football from pitch-level, with the threat of getting soaked from threatening rain clouds that seem to gather all too frequently.

Every so often, we may be lucky enough to get a space on the platform. This is rightly run on a rota basis, to ensure that everyone gets a chance to use this excellent facility. The platform gives wheelchair users an excellent overview of the action, while surrounded by their fellow supporters. It is this inclusion, that makes going to games enjoyable – even if it is a goalless encounter with Borehamwood.

The football club have proposed the building of a second platform, but it should be noted that many DSA members are not particularly enthused with the solution that the club have put forward. This is due to the fact that the intended platform will be situated in no-man’s land, between vocal home and away fans. This is clearly not the safest place to spend 90 minutes, neither is it keeping in the inclusive nature of the first platform. DSA members should not have to watch the game from a segregated space. The DSA had originally proposed the removal of a couple of rows of seats in a specific part of the ground, but such proposals – there were two of them – were scrapped as it seems potential profit from maximum capacity, is more important than providing equal access to all. This is very disappointing from a former community club.

A focus-group was set up to consider the building of a second platform. This was made up of representatives of the club board, DSA committee members and the DLO. The last meeting of this focus-group was nine months ago, which shows how highly it is being prioritised by those hell-bent on a return to the Football League – never mind the cost.

As a result, I will not be renewing my season ticket and will only be going to games at the Racecourse when it is my turn on the rota for the platform. Instead, I will be watching football matches at various different grounds, with one ear on the Wrexham score. I will always love and support the club, but I cannot be disregarded and humiliated any further. By writing posts like these, I hope to tap in to some common decency that will help the club find the motivation to work on the resolution,that was passed overwhelmingly by club owners, twelve months ago…

COYR.

Since writing this, it has come to my attention that the issue of a second disabled platform is back on the club’s agenda. I am not holding my breath for any improvement in the near future, but I would love to be proved wrong. It is about time the club concentrated on becoming a true community club where everyone is welcomed and included.

 

If It Doesn’t Challenge You, It Won’t Change You

It has been a busy old week that has included hospital visit to the cardiologist and physiotherapist, as well as stressful meetings with the Wrexham Supporters Trust board and illuminating emails from Welsh Labour bureaucrats  that clearly show that the Welsh Government have something to hide over the WILG debacle.

HEALTH 

It has been a mixed week health wise. Depending on where you stand, my visit to the cardiologist revealed good/bad news that my heart is in good working order and I don’t have to return to the cardiologist for another twelve months.

I have also been to see the physiotherapist who raised concerns about my posture in my wheelchair. This echoed concerns raised by the wheelchair assessment team who I visited a few weeks ago. While I was with the physiotherapist she showed me, on a skeleton, the extent of my scoliosis. It was upsetting to watch her bend the spine of the skeleton in to a disfigured position. I guess this is life with ataxia – constantly trying to come to terms with a disability that is forever stressing.

MEETING WITH WREXHAM SUPPORTERS TRUST 

On Wednesday night I was at a meeting with some familiar faces who I have mingled with for over thirty years, as a Wrexham AFC supporter. However, the majority of people at this meeting between the board of Wrexham Supporters Trust and the Disabled Supporters Association Committee did not seem to show any understanding of consideration to the plight of disabled supporters in general.

This is neither the time, nor place to go into a deep discussion of everything that was said at the meeting – I will save that for another day, but it should be noted that I was hugely disgruntled by the attitudes shown by a so-called ‘community club’.

SUSPICIOUS MINDS

I will be writing a separate blog dedicated to the highly suspicious actions of the Welsh Government in the latest communication as the battle to #SaveWILG continues and intensifies.

I am being put under an intense amount of pressure as my body deteriorates and being forced to fight for the right of disabled people against the Welsh Government, Wrexham Council and Wrexham AFC. Luckily I have been fighting all of my life and I have the strength and stamina to carry on standing up for what is right thanks to my amazing circle of friends and comrades…

TOM ALLEN 

36634891_10155554936421846_1430258593860419584_On Thursday evening [26/7/2018] I went to watch the supremely funny Tom Allen in action at William Aston Hall at Glyndwr University.

I have watched this comedian performing before, when he starred alongside Suzi Ruffell at the Catrin Finch Centre, which is also part of Glyndwr University.

When I heard that Allen was performing at the Catrin Finch Centre again, I quickly snapped up tickets. This was some time last year I think. Earlier this year I received a phone call saying that due to the high demand for tickets, the show would be moved to the larger William Aston Hall. I was disappointed by this as the Catrin Finch Centre is a more intimate venue, where comedians do not need to rely on the use of a microphone. This is good for me and my hearing, which struggles to fully grasp what is being said when a voice is projected through a microphone.

Last night proved that this is indeed the case. I was frustrated beyond belief as Allen energetically pranced around the stage in front of me, and came out with classic quips judging by the roars of laughter around me. Alas, I could not decipher any of the jokes and could only pick up on certain words such as ‘party rings’, ‘ham sandwiches’ and   ‘Phil Spencer’.

Subsequently, I decided to leave at the interval. This was no judgement on Tom Allen, but just another frustrating sign that my progressive condition is accelerating and stopping me from doing things that I enjoy. What I really needed was subtitles and this got me thinking. Last week, I attended a Disability Wales conference on Direct Payments in Newtown, Mid Wales. Disability Wales had organised for  Palyntype support to be available.

This is basically a machine for typing in shorthand, now often used in transcribing speech to text for deaf people.This transcription was projected on to a large screen so those that are hard of hearing can follow everything that is being said. I found this to be extremely useful and beneficial, and would have appreciated it last night. If I ever #SaveWILG this is something that I would like to campaign for being used in may more locations across the country, as we strive to make events accessible to all.

I am hoping for a quieter weekend…

WST notice of Annual General Meeting

WREXHAM SUPPORTERS TRUST

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Wrexham Football Supporters’ Society (known as the Wrexham Supporters Trust, “WST”) will be held at 7.30pm on Thursday 26th May 2016 at the Centenary Club, The Racecourse Ground, Wrexham LL11 2AH.

Notice of Elections:
There will be three vacancies on the Trust Board. An Election Nominations Form accompanies this notice which must be completed and returned (with the candidate’s statement) to the Secretary WST AGM, “Freepost WST” by Friday 22nd April 2016. Members interested in standing will find information about the role below.

Candidates are also encouraged to send their nominations by email to secretary@wst.org.uk (this is not compulsory and should be in addition to the posted hard copy).

Should there be three or less candidates for the vacancies, there will not be a formal ballot of members but instead those people validly nominated will be put to the Annual General Meeting enbloc for an affirmative vote.

Call for Resolutions:
In addition to any resolutions that will be put forward by the Trust Board, members can submit their own resolutions to the meeting. Such a resolution must be submitted (in accordance with Rule 27 of the Society) to the Secretary by Thursday 28th April 2016. Please send any proposals to the Secretary WST AGM, ’ Freepost WST’ and preferably by email as well to secretary@wst.org.uk

Alan Fox
WST Independent Secretary

A season to remember…

Whatever happens in the final few games of the season, Wrexham fans can look back on a successful 2015/16 campaign with a well-earned sense of pride and achievement.

In January, our fan-owned club posted an operating profit for the first time in 15 years and last month Supporters Trust members voted overwhelmingly in favour of agreeing a 99-year lease with stadium owner Glyndwr University. Such progress shows the potential and ambition of our community club – a club that is open to everyone as shown through the remarkable work of the Disabled Supporters Association.

This will probably sound strange to most people, but one of my most cherished memories of 2015/16 came when we lost 1-3 against Woking at the Racecourse. It was a cold, dark and dismal January afternoon that I would have usually spent at home watching Final Score, but due to the fact that the DSA had worked tirelessly to open and maintain the swanky new viewing platform I was able to watch the match without getting drenched and with an excellent view of proceedings.

Dominic Vose scored a sublime free-kick, I got to meet the First Minister Carwyn Jones and I was also able to be a part of the crowd – it may have been a disappointed and disgruntled crowd, but at least I was part of it and not having to endure the waffling of Mark Clemmit.

The viewing platform has been a major success story for the club as a whole. It has drawn positive attention and admiration from the football world and beyond with visits from Lord Faulkner and Carwyn Jones, articles in the national press, plus a feature on the BBC national news. This new facility has also encouraged a push for clubs at the top of the game to follow the example we’ve set and has helped inspire the Accessible Grounds Bill that is currently going through the House of Commons.

The work that the Disabled Supporters Association has done is clearly not just benefiting Wrexham fans but disabled fans throughout the game. We can all be proud of this as all the work of the DSA relies on the generosity of sponsors, volunteers and fellow fans.

We do not want to rest on our laurels though. There is still much more work that needs to be done to make football matches accessible for all. I encourage everyone to get involved in this as there are many projects being run by the DSA and WST to help ensure our whole community can enjoy being part of our forward thinking community. We need help and support to establish a hearing loop at the ground, are currently working to become Dementia Friendly and recently held a Football v Homophobia day at the Racecourse.

In addition to all this we also need to keep pushing ahead with plans to build more viewing platforms. At the moment, we only have space to accommodate ten spectators in wheelchairs per match, but demand is far greater than this meaning that we have to operate a rota system. Therefore, supporters in wheelchairs cannot access the platform on a regular basis even though they want to support the club they love at every home game without having to put up with a poor pitch-level view and the risk of getting soaked. We also need to consider the needs of opposition supporters as everyone should be accommodated for at our stadium.

The DSA is currently approaching architects to design and price a second viewing platform to be built at the Racecourse. We have already shown other clubs the way forward with our wonderful facilities, but need to continue this good work to open our doors to everyone. After all, there is only so much of Mark Clemmit a man can stomach…