Wrexham AFC

Memory Match – 30-01-37

It has been a while since I last wrote a Memory Match column. I spent 2015-2018 writing these articles for the Wrexham AFC matchday programme when we were proud to be a community club.

Unfortunately, the club’s treatment of disabled supporters is nothing short of a disgrace, while the treatment of the proactive Disabled Supporters Association leaves a lot to be desired. I am therefore withdrawing my support of the club until ALL disabled supporters are given adequate and inclusive facilities from which to enjoy the football served up at the Racecourse.

Instead I will go to watch 90 minutes of action, wherever I feel I am welcomed. It goes without saying that I will always have one ear on the Wrexham result as it is not the actual club that I have fallen out with. It is merely the way the club is being run that I have an issue with. I will continue to attend matches when it is my turn on the platform rota and away matches, but I am not wasting any more time at the bottom of the stand with an abysmal view of the action while exposed to the elements. It is a disgrace that disabled supporters are being treated in such a way at the start of the 21st century.

I still want to continue with these Memory Match articles as they proved popular. I also enjoy writing them and remembering a time when it was enjoyable to visit the Racecourse and watch a decent standard of football.

30/01/37

Wrexham v Oldham Athletic

League Division Three (Northern Section)

Racecourse Ground

Result: 1-1

 Wrexham: McMahon, Evans, Hamilton, Mitchell, Lewis, Snow, Barrow, White, Lapham, Lawrence, Burgon

Goalscorer: White

 Oldham Athletic: Caunce, Hilton, Price, Williamson, Milligan, Gray, Jones, McCormick, Davis, Robbins, Downes

Goalscorer: Gray

Attendance: 2,511

Season 1936/37 got off to an awful start, with a 4-1 drubbing at Chester. Under the guidance of manager Ernie Blackburn, Wrexham soon forgot this calamitous defeat and rose to a mid-table position as we entered the New Year. However, our 2-0 reverse against Stockport County at Edgeley Park on January 2nd proved to be Blackburn’s final game in charge.

Hull City tempted Blackburn away from the Racecourse and a committee was responsible for selecting our starting 11 for the next three games. This included an FA Cup third round clash with Manchester City at the Cae Ras which was witnessed by 20,600 spectators. The Division One side won the match 1-3, but Wrexham pushed them all the way and could be proud of their performance.

Ahead of our home encounter against Oldham Athletic at the end of January, the club appointed Captain James Logan as their fourth manager. We had won our previous two League games under the leadership of the selection committee, so hopes were high that we could continue this form against fifth placed Athletic.

Less than 2,500 supporters braved the wintry weather to spend a chilly afternoon watching their heroes try to play football, on a pitch that more closely resembled a skating rink, with a light dusting of snow. Subsequently, conditions threatened to spoil the game, but Wrexham adapted themselves and pursued a policy of passing that disorientated the scrappy and disjointed Latics.

The home team were on top in the early stages. According to the scribe in the North Wales Guardian: “[Archie] Burgon was like a terrier on the touchline, worrying the defence whenever the ball came anywhere near him, by his eagerness in seizing on the slightest chance”.

Oldham’s tactics seemed quite cynical, and when Burgon was brought down in the box by Billy Hilton, the crowd clambered for a penalty. However, the referee waved away these claims to the satisfaction of our friend from the North Wales Guardian, who suggests that the Nottingham-born winger simply slipped.

Alfie White got on the scoresheet after 35 minutes, following a free-kick that was given for another assault on Burgon. George Snow delivered a delightful ball from the resulting set-piece, that White headed past Lewis Caunce in the Athletic goal. Logan’s new charges then spent the final 10 minutes of the first half, bombarding the visitors’ goal, Matt Lawrence in particular had two shots in quick succession and was unfortunate to see them saved by Caunce.

The second half failed to produce as much goalmouth action, as the first 45 minutes had. The heavy cloud led to poor light, “which seemed to blur the players’ figures in to mere silhouettes, and make it difficult to distinguish individuals”. Pat McMahon was pressed in to action more often as the game progressed, but there seemed little sting to the visitors’ raids.

The Latics eventually capitalised on a mistake by McMahon late in the game. The Glasgow-born goalkeeper made a fatal mistake by punching away a threatening ball, when it seemed much easier to have gathered the ball safely in his arms. The feeble punch was insufficient to clear the danger, and landed at the feet of Matt Gray who returned a low, rasping drive past McMahon’s despairing dive.

***

 In the Leader, ‘XYZ’ highlights a number of elderly spectators who had attended the game on such a brutally cold day:

“One old player, who gained a Welsh cap fifty-nine years ago was present! Another of the old brigade, who was at Newton Heath in the eighties’, stood in the enclosure and a third sporting veteran who had seen seventy-three, or four winters – Mr T.H. Jones (‘The Artist’) – occupied his ‘box’ seat in the paddock, and smiled at the cold.”

***

I cannot move on without mentioning the other headlines that I discovered while looking through local newspapers from January/February 1937. Several articles tell of Wrexham footballers being embroiled in a licensing prosecution. It turned out that four prominent members of our playing staff – George Snow, Jack Lewis, Alfie White and Ambrose Brown – were caught consuming alcohol after permitted hours at the Horseshoe Inn, Bank Street on the evening of January 16th 1937. This was the same day that we had pushed Manchester City all the way in the third round of the FA Cup.

All the defendants pleaded not-guilty, but after a lengthy retirement the Chairman said that the bench had decided to convict in the cases of all four players. They were each fined 10s 6d for daring to enjoy a post-match pint after 22:00 following a gutsy Cup display. Heaven forbid.

Memory Match – 12-10-35

It has been a while since I last wrote a Memory Match column. I spent 2015-2018 writing these articles for the Wrexham AFC matchday programme when we were proud to be a community club.

Unfortunately, the club’s treatment of disabled supporters is nothing short of a disgrace, while the treatment of the proactive Disabled Supporters Association leaves a lot to be desired. I am therefore withdrawing my support of the club until ALL disabled supporters are given adequate and inclusive facilities from which to enjoy the football served up at the Racecourse.

Instead I will go to watch 90 minutes of action, wherever I feel I am welcomed. It goes without saying that I will always have one ear on the Wrexham result as it is not the actual club that I have fallen out with. It is merely the way the club is being run that I have an issue with. I will continue to attend matches when it is my turn on the platform rota and away matches, but I am not wasting any more time at the bottom of the stand with an abysmal view of the action while exposed to the elements. It is a disgrace that disabled supporters are being treated in such a way at the start of the 21st century.

I still want to continue with these Memory Match articles as they proved popular. I also enjoy writing them and remembering a time when it was enjoyable to visit the Racecourse and watch a decent standard of football.

12-10-35

Wrexham v Tranmere Rovers

League Division Three (Northern Section)

Racecourse Ground

Result: 4-0

Wrexham: McMahon, Jones, Hamilton, Lawrence, McMahon, Richards, Mustard, Gardiner, McCartney, Fryer, Gunson

Goalscorers: McCartney (3), Fryer

Tranmere Rovers: Gray, Platt, Fairhurst, Curtis, Newton, Hopkinson, Eden, Macdonald, Bell, Woodward, Urmson

Attendance: 9,497

Following the previous season’s form, many Wrexham fans would have thought that the only way was up. They should have thought again…

Three wins on the bounce at the start of the season, had inspired confidence and performances were not too bad – if a little inconsistent – until the festive period. From Christmas until March, Wrexham failed to win a single game. In fact, they only recorded four more victories during the rest of the season.

Our unpredictable form was beginning to become apparent, when we welcomed Tranmere Rovers to the Racecourse in October. Since the explosive start that we had made to the season, there had been five defeats and two victories in the run up to this game. A week earlier, Gateshead beat us 2-0 at Redheugh Park, thanks to a double from Jack Allen.

Expectations must have been low, going in to this encounter with our cross-border rivals – not only due to our erratic form, but because Rovers were unbeaten in their opening nine games. During this period, they had notched 17 goals in comparison to our modest tally of seven.

Playing with a dazzling sun in their faces, Wrexham quickly got off the mark. Inside right Archie Gardiner, was a constant attacking threat and his decisive through ball left Jack Mustard with an open goal, but he somehow shot over the bar. It was an impressive start by the hosts, and Tranmere goalkeeper Bert Gray made some fine saves before Jack Fryer put the Town in front after 26 minutes.

Tranmere briefly rallied before the break, but Billy Eden’s shot went narrowly wide of the target. The away side still posed a threat, but within only two minutes of the restart Wrexham went further ahead – Charlie McCartney ran in to volley Gordon Gunson’s cross in to the net.

With a two-goal cushion the Blues dared to sit back on their lead, but within seconds Rovers ran clean through to score – only for the effort to be disallowed for an apparent infringement. Visiting players appealed strenuously against this decision, and were obviously determined to get back in the game. Pat McMahon’s goal led a charmed existence, with only the cross-bar saving him on one occasion.

A breakaway on the left led to McCartney making the issue safe, with a spectacular left-foot drive. The Stamford born centre-forward completed his hat-trick near the end of the game, following clever work by Gunson.

***

It is sometimes confusing when reading match reports from the Leader and North Wales Guardian, as they often contain conflicting accounts. According to ‘XYZ’ in the Leader, Tranmere had two goals disallowed, but only one was mentioned in the North Wales Guardian. XYZ reckoned that “twice the ball was placed in the Wrexham net, but the referee declined to award a goal. In the first case Bell… seemed to be definitely offside. In the second instance, I was not so sure where Alfred Jones was at the all-important moment. The referee Mr Isaac Caswell, however, was adamant and he brushed aside the Tranmere players who appealed for a goal, and steadfastly declined to allow it”

***

Wrexham ended the 1935/36 season in an uninspiring 18th position and our cup form was equally disappointing. Barrow dismissed us in the first round of the FA Cup after beating us 4-1 at Holker Street, while we received byes in the Welsh Cup up to the Sixth Round stage where we lost to Rhyl (2-1) at Belle Vue after a replay.

The Third Division North Cup saw us draw 2-2 at the Racecourse against Chester, who punished us in the replay by coasting to a 4-0 victory.

Kick in the Teeth…

The following statement has been published on the Wrexham Supporters Trust website and as you can imagine I am far from happy for a number of reasons.

Basically everything that I wrote in my previous blog, entitled Making a Stand , still holds true as nothing that we requested in our original resolution has been fulfilled with the building of a hugely unpopular second platform that is light years away from the inclusive nature of disabled facilities recommended by Level Playing Field and similar organisations.

I would also question why the authors of the original resolution, or the DSA itself, were not regularly consulted as the WST undertook their binding duty to fulfil the wishes of club owners. Yet again I feel that the disabled fan base have been let down and fobbed off by a self-interested committee who have little interest in providing equal access for all.

A new acquaintance of mine has summed up the dire situation at the Racecourse perfectly with the following quote:

I have been a Wrexham supporter for 40 years. There have been high points, low points but consistently throughout that 40 years I have felt a sense of belonging. An albeit small part of a common bond that cements me not only to Wrexham Football Club, but my town. I have no doubt that every Wrexham fan feels exactly the same way. That feeling every match day when we get together with our friends and enjoy that unity in supporting the club we ALL love.

Now imagine for a moment that the people who we have entrusted to oversee our joint investment in OUR club feel that not every fan should enjoy that feeling of being included within the Wrexham AFC family. Imagine if you will, that on matchday you are told that you cannot be amongst your friends, that you cannot feel part of that ground swell of anticipation as the team press forward, imagine being told for instance that you cannot feel part of that, that you have to forsake that because you have a disability!

Would any fan without a disability feel happy feeling that in some way that they were being segregated? I guess not, imagine turning up on matchday with your mates and being singled out as not being included. Imagine that this was said to you by a supporters trust whose very purpose was to promote an inclusive community club. Just imagine that, a community fan owned football club who cannot grasp who their community is. An “inclusive” football club who fail to include. Not really the dream that the WST sold us, is it?

Every trust member, every Wrexham AFC fan needs to be aware of what is going on, and every WST board member needs to be aware of their responsibilities. This is not a jolly for them, they have to be held accountable for every decision they make and we all have to keep making them aware of that.

***

The following statement has been published on the Wrexham Supporters Trust website:

Following a meeting with representatives of Wrexham Supporters Trust, Wrexham Association Football Club board, Wrexham AFC Disability Liaison Officer and Wrexham Disabled Supporters Association on Wednesday evening we can inform members work on construction of the new viewing platform will begin in early September.

The new viewing platform will be available for use by both home and away supporters as the location is suitable for either set of supporters to feel a part of the atmosphere with their fellow fans. The platform will be constructed on the land between the Tech End and BKoncepts stand in the stadium. Due to its placement giving a front on view of the pitch, the viewing platform will be suitable for use by supporters with neck and spinal injuries as recommended by Level Playing Field ( https://www.levelplayingfield.org.uk). Representatives of WST and Wrexham Association Football Club have been in regular dialogue with Level Playing Field and they have offered their support for the platform location.

The construction project will also include a refurbishment of the existing toilet blocks in that area to ensure they will be suitable to be used by all supporters accessing the platform. Supporters catering needs will mirror those currently used at Platform 1 in the Hays Travel Stand.

Wrexham Supporters Trust and Wrexham Football Club are committed to improving facilities for all supporters and are currently working on numerous projects to improve the match day experience. We will continue to keep members updated of the progress and would like to take this opportunity to thank our members for their patience in the building of the platform. We are sure every member and supporter of Wrexham AFC is looking forward to seeing the platform in use.

Colonel Blink: War Games

 

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This morning I have been to Specsavers in Broughton to pick up two new pairs of glasses. This is important for two reasons:

I usually visit Specsavers in Wrexham for my annual check up. This year I have been forced to make the longer journey to Broughton due to the hassle of  parking my car in Wrexham. When I launched a petition last year to fight the proposed introduction of car parking charges for Blue Badge holders, I argued that the town would suffer as a consequence. I am now totally evading my hometown in favour of a retail park in Flintshire that offers free parking in a well policed, nonthreatening and clean environment.

It is a sad indictment of how far the Conservative/Independent led Council have let the town decline, that I would rather drive to a less convenient location for an essential piece of business. I will continue to do this while the Council is being led by many short sighted and unscrupulous buffoons who care more about lining their own pockets rather than doing what is best for the town.

***

I have had to have a new pair of varifocals. I am having a tough time getting used to them. The optician said it could take up to two or even three weeks for my eyes to adjust as there is a lot going on with my new lenses. I have also had new frames and think my new look suits me – at least I hope it does…

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A potential new anthem for fans of Wrexham AFC? #JustSaying

Memory Match – 25-08-28

It has been a while since I last wrote a Memory Match column. I spent 2015-2018 writing these articles for the Wrexham AFC matchday programme when we were proud to be a community club.

Unfortunately, the club’s treatment of disabled supporters is nothing short of a disgrace, while the treatment of the proactive Disabled Supporters Association leaves a lot to be desired. I am therefore withdrawing my support of the club until ALL disabled supporters are given adequate and inclusive facilities from which to enjoy the football served up at the Racecourse.

Instead I will go to watch 90 minutes of action, wherever I feel I am welcomed. It goes without saying that I will always have one ear on the Wrexham result as it is not the actual club that I have fallen out with. It is merely the way the club is being run that I have an issue with. I will continue to attend matches when it is my turn on the platform rota and away matches, but I am not wasting any more time at the bottom of the stand with an abysmal view of the action while exposed to the elements. It is a disgrace that disabled supporters are being treated in such a way at the start of the 21st century.

I still want to continue with these Memory Match articles as they proved popular. I also enjoy writing them and remembering a time when it was enjoyable to visit the Racecourse and watch a decent standard of football.

25/08/28

Wrexham v Chesterfield

League Division Three (Northern Section)

Racecourse Ground

Result: 4-3

 Wrexham: Greatrex, Jones, Lumberg, Read, Bellis, Graham, Longmuir, Rogers, Mays, Woodhouse, Gunson

Goalscorers: Mays (4)

 Chesterfield: Bilcliff, Beeson, Bicknell, Wass, Fell, Neale, Bloxham, Roseboom, Cowan, Taylor, Lee

Goalscorers: Roseboom, Bloxham, Cowan,

Attendance: 5,463

Following yet another anonymous season in mid-table, Wrexham excelled in 1928/29 and finished third in the League table. Chesterfield visited the Racecourse on the opening day of the season and the club were hopeful that the arrival of Albert ‘Billy’ Mays from Merthyr Town would help propel them to greater heights. The centre-forward had previous League experience with Bristol City, Plymouth Argyle and the South Wales club, so hopes were high.

Writing in the Leader, ‘XYZ’ summed up his impression of the new marksman following this first match of the season:

Mays made a favourable impression and scored four goals. This was the best individual performance in League football on Saturday and the great ovation he received from the spectators was fully deserved.

Mays gave Wrexham the lead after 15 minutes, but just 10 minutes later Chesterfield equalised when Jack Lee raced away from Teddy Read and Alf Jones, to deliver a fine centre. Ken Greatrex punched clear, but the ball only found Teddy Roseboom, who got his name on the scoresheet.

Worse was to follow before the interval, as another attack down the left flank by Lee, led to William Cowan scoring a second for the visitors.

Wrexham fought back in the second period and showed plenty of aggression. Archie Longmuir fired in a couple of first-time shots, while Billie Rogers was very unlucky not to score with a ferocious cross-shot. Eventually, Mays restored parity from a Gunson centre, but Chesterfield were not to be outdone. Albert Bloxham was the man to put the visitors back in control, but this sensational game was still far from over. Gunson and Mays combined, before the centre-forward drew the keeper out and completed his hat-trick.

The fat lady hadn’t started to sing yet though and Wrexham carried on attacking. That man Mays headed home the winning goal from a corner in the last minute.

We were off to a winning start. Things would continue in a positive vein, with six more wins and three draws before we fell to our first defeat of the season, against Stockport County at Edgeley Park (6-2).

Bradford City eventually won promotion from the Third Division North that season. They finished a single point ahead of Stockport County, and 11 points clear of third placed Wrexham.

***

Billy Mays ended the season with 32 League goals. This was not the last time that he secured a 4-goal haul, as he repeated this trick on January the 5th 1929, in a 5-0 home thrashing of Barrow.

***

Season 1928/29 was also significant as it saw the first Wrexham goal by a certain Tommy Bamford. He struck in a 4-0 crushing of Accrington Stanley at the Racecourse, on the 30th of March 1929.

***

Unfortunately, our success in the League did not transfer to the Cup competitions. We were knocked out of the FA Cup at the First Round stage, when Carlisle United visited the Racecourse and scraped a 0-1 victory. It was a similar story in the Welsh Cup, as Rhyl secured a 2-4 victory at the Cae Ras at the Fifth Round stage. We had received byes for the previous rounds.

Making a Stand

Twelve months ago, Ian Parry and myself – both life-long supporters of Wrexham AFC – wrote the following resolution to be put to the Wrexham Supporters Trust AGM:

It has come to our attention that Wrexham AFC, whether through a lack of finance, vision or compassion, have let the proposed building of further wheelchair viewing platforms become an infuriatingly long drawn out and laborious, unfinished, process.

Since the opening of the inaugural platform  in 2015 by Lord Faulkner of Worcester, Wrexham AFC has had an abundance of positive nationwide publicity regarding this new facility for disabled fans. However, instead of striding forward and consolidating this with additional facilities, the club has rested on its laurels and appears content to sit back and accept the plaudits for achieving the implementation of a single solitary wheelchair viewing platform.

We believe that rather than this be the minimum requirement it should have indeed been a catalyst for further development and an opportunity to show many other clubs how to accommodate and welcome disabled supporters.

The official capacity of My Racecourse is quoted as 10,500 and according to the recently published “Green Guide” it states that “there should be 100 wheelchair spaces in a venue of 10,000 or more seats” At the moment My Racecourse has 6 designated wheelchair spaces on the wheelchair viewing platform, whilst the other “designated” wheelchair spaces are in fact seats designed for able bodied supporters where wheelchair users are expected to comfortably position themselves; more often with a carer squeezing in alongside.

Many disabled Wrexham fans attend matches in all weather conditions and deserve at least the basic right of shelter. Additional and improved disabled viewing facilities would show that the club does indeed care, recognises and appreciates their dedicated support.

We note that the club originally applied for funding for 3 platforms at £18,000 each in 2014/15.

Our Resolution is this:-

That WST agree:

  1. To have designated wheelchair and carer bays at the front of the Hays Travel stand.
  2. That the club take action as soon as possible on further platforms as soon as funding is in place, and the plans have been passed by Wrexham Council and by the Safety Officer.
  3. That these new facilities are not tied in to, or dependent upon, any other stadium redevelopments.
  4. That the club meets minimum standards of accessibility at the earliest possible opportunity.

 

It is time for the 2019 AGM, which takes place on 27th June. You would have expected much progress to have been made to enable wheelchair spectators such as myself and Ian, to enjoy an afternoon at the Racecourse with fellow fans. Unfortunately, next to no progress has been made and we are still watching 80% of games at pitch-level at the front of the stand. This section does not provide adequate cover, so we are often at the mercy of the elements. This pitch-side area has not even been specifically designated as we called for last year.

I can’t speak for Ian, but I have had enough of being treated like a second-class citizen. It is no fun watching a poor standard of football from pitch-level, with the threat of getting soaked from threatening rain clouds that seem to gather all too frequently.

Every so often, we may be lucky enough to get a space on the platform. This is rightly run on a rota basis, to ensure that everyone gets a chance to use this excellent facility. The platform gives wheelchair users an excellent overview of the action, while surrounded by their fellow supporters. It is this inclusion, that makes going to games enjoyable – even if it is a goalless encounter with Borehamwood.

The football club have proposed the building of a second platform, but it should be noted that many DSA members are not particularly enthused with the solution that the club have put forward. This is due to the fact that the intended platform will be situated in no-man’s land, between vocal home and away fans. This is clearly not the safest place to spend 90 minutes, neither is it keeping in the inclusive nature of the first platform. DSA members should not have to watch the game from a segregated space. The DSA had originally proposed the removal of a couple of rows of seats in a specific part of the ground, but such proposals – there were two of them – were scrapped as it seems potential profit from maximum capacity, is more important than providing equal access to all. This is very disappointing from a former community club.

A focus-group was set up to consider the building of a second platform. This was made up of representatives of the club board, DSA committee members and the DLO. The last meeting of this focus-group was nine months ago, which shows how highly it is being prioritised by those hell-bent on a return to the Football League – never mind the cost.

As a result, I will not be renewing my season ticket and will only be going to games at the Racecourse when it is my turn on the rota for the platform. Instead, I will be watching football matches at various different grounds, with one ear on the Wrexham score. I will always love and support the club, but I cannot be disregarded and humiliated any further. By writing posts like these, I hope to tap in to some common decency that will help the club find the motivation to work on the resolution,that was passed overwhelmingly by club owners, twelve months ago…

COYR.

Since writing this, it has come to my attention that the issue of a second disabled platform is back on the club’s agenda. I am not holding my breath for any improvement in the near future, but I would love to be proved wrong. It is about time the club concentrated on becoming a true community club where everyone is welcomed and included.

 

Great Tastes of America: The Mississippi Stack

DISCLAIMER: The following blog is written totally independently from McDonald’s CorporationGreat Tastes of America is a registered trademark and I am not associated with the product line in any way. I am not seeking to promote or disparage the American fast food giant in any way, shape or form. All opinions expressed below are personal to me and my Socialist background. I should add that anything written on these blogs should be taken with a pinch of salt – sachets available from McDonald’s counters. 

In the second of a new series, I will be eating and reviewing the Great Tastes of America range of burgers from popular fast food chain, McDonald’s.

I am unhappy about this for a number of reasons – from calories to Capitalism – but it is a good writing mechanism for me to hang my anger at modern society upon. I will be forcing fast food meals down my fat face for the next 12 weeks (one every fortnight) while discussing everything that I find unappetising about the modern world we live in.

***

The Mississippi Stack is made up of two 100% British and Irish beef burgers with bacon, mild cheddar, tomato and onion relish, rich and sticky BBQ sauce, red onion and lettuce in a toasted ciabatta.

Mississipi Stack

I demolished the Mississippi Stack in the car at the side of the road on my way to the pub to watch Newport County v Tranmere Rovers in the League Two Play-off Final. This was a contest between two teams that most Wrexham fans – myself included – have reason to dislike. Both teams have recently won promotion from the National League while Wrexham have proved hapless also-rans who seem destined to a future of non-league football.

With feelings of justified bitterness and a hint of jealousy, I tucked in to my fortnightly taste of America that did little to lift my spirits. It was devoid of the sharp pickle that had made the New York Stack so enjoyable. Instead, there was a minimal layer of  onion relish and a BBQ sauce that proved slightly spicy, but ultimately underwhelming. There was just not enough of the BBQ sauce and the outer edges of the slimline burgers were dry, uninspiring and tasteless.

If I had been in a better mood before indulging in this burger, my review may have been more positive but I was gripped  with envy – something that was not helped by former Wrexham forward, Connor Jennings, scoring the winning goal for Tranmere Rovers deep into extra-time. If only he had stayed loyal to the Red Dragons and not been tempted to our Scouse rivals by the smell of filthy lucre.

The hunger pains are still biting as I type whilst generally irritated and dismayed at all around me. Satisfaction will never be found in the selfish modern world that we are stuck in…

***

This long bank holiday weekend is one to forget. The results of the EU Elections have been pouring in and suggest worrying times ahead with the rise of right-wing ignorance across the continent.

No where was this more obvious than in the UK with the supposed rise of the Brexit Party and typically biased reporting by the BBC who merely paint a picture to support the prevailing status quo. This was summed up in the following tweet by Timothy Garton Ash (@fromTGA):

I am also sharing a Facebook post from my friend and comrade Adam Samuels, who has sensibly reflected on the election results and made the following observations:

Re the Euro elections from a Labour POV… So far, what this says to me is that people are even more entrenched in their views. The country is even more split if that were possible. People are pig-headed and not willing to compromise. It’s f**k the other side. There is no good solution. We should also remember this is not a General Election. It was also PR and not FPTP. I am saying of course we should listen and respect the comments and votes, but we must get all the information in first and then digest everything. No knee jerk reactions. No bold statements of “If Labour don’t do XYZ I am leaving, not campaigning, not voting etc”.

We take stock and reason things out. There are no easy answers, no matter what extreme Leavers and Remainers will tell us. The two things we must never forget, and we must remind emotional, passionate, good comrades is that we need our Manifesto put into practice. But, and we must never underestimate this, we need someone strong enough to take the crap and attacks to allow those policies to get through. Of course, that is Jeremy Corbyn. 

This story will continue to develop and expand as the hours pass. This is a truly explosive time to be involved in politics and it is taking all of our energy and resources to continue the good fight. However, no one should be in any doubt that we will all continue pushing for justice for the many, not the few while ensuring everyone is protected in a fair and equal society.

The fight goes on…