Steve Diggle

Emergency on Planet Earth #8

I WILL WRITE A NUMBER OF EMERGENCY ON PLANET EARTH BLOGS THROUGHOUT THE TORY SPONSORED CORONAVIRUS CRISIS.

What follows is a random collection of thoughts from a human being trapped in 21st Century British society.

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Wednesday 8th April

I have been stuck indoors since March 5th, and boredom is really hitting home now. I suppose that disable people like myself, are used to having limitations placed on their lives, so in a funny way we are more adept to living with the restrictions of a lockdown.

I have been frittering away the time by completing the music listography that my sister bought me as a birthday gift, back in February. I may as well share parts of this listography with my readers, and encourage people to leave their lists in the comments section.

The problem, I find, with a musical listography is that such lists change depending on my mood. All I can say is that this list is fairly representative of my musical tastes. There is no particular order to this list, but it is fair to say that the Buzzcocks will always be my number 1 favourite band.

Music Listography

20 favourite bands:

  1. Buzzcocks
  2. The Rolling Stones
  3. Sex Pistols
  4. Oasis
  5. The Beatles
  6. Radiohead
  7. Stereophonics
  8. Manic Street Preachers
  9. Pulp
  10. Space
  11. Public Image Limited
  12. X-Ray Spex
  13. Stiff Little Fingers
  14. Green Day
  15. Ash
  16. The Bluetones
  17. Sleeper
  18. Travis
  19. The Zutons
  20. The Kinks

After each entry to my listography, I will include a video from a performer on my list. I will start off with a performance of ‘What Do I Get?’ from my all time favourite band, Buzzcocks.

From Wikipedia:

Buzzcocks are an English punk rock band formed in Bolton, England in 1976 by singer-songwriter-guitarist Pete Shelley and singer-songwriter Howard Devoto.[4] They are regarded as a seminal influence on the Manchester music scene, the independent record label movement, punk rockpower pop,[5] and pop punk. They achieved commercial success with singles that fused pop craftsmanship with rapid-fire punk energy. These singles were collected on Singles Going Steady, described by critic Ned Raggett as a “punk masterpiece”.[6]

Devoto and Shelley chose the name “Buzzcocks” after reading the headline, “It’s the Buzz, Cock!”, in a review of the TV series Rock Follies in Time Out magazine. The “buzz” is the excitement of playing on stage; “cock” is northern English slang meaning “friend”. They thought it captured the excitement of the nascent punk scene, as well as having humorous sexual connotations following Peter Shelley’s time working in a Bolton adult shop.[7] Per the band, there is no “the” in Buzzcocks.[8]

Devoto left the band in 1977, after which Pete Shelley became the principal singer-songwriter.[9] Shelley died on 6 December 2018,[10] but the band has remained active with Diggle assuming lead vocal duties.[11] They are currently performing with new guitarist Mani Perazzoli.[12]

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Here are a few interesting articles, that I think might be of interest to my readers. The first two touch upon the furloughing of non-playing staff by Liverpool Football Club. These are followed by an article on how to boost your immune system, that appears on the ‘Linwood Health Foods’ website. Each article can be seen in their original format by clicking on the links below.

‘What would Shankly do?’ Not what Liverpool are doing, that’s for sure

Liverpool chief executive officer Peter Moore has issued the following letter to supporters. 

10 GREAT WAYS TO BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

 

Pete Shelley Tribute: Day 4

On my Facebook page I am posting a week long tribute to the late, great Pete Shelley and I thought I would post these on my Blog as well so that as many people as possible can enjoy his music.

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I have chosen to feature ‘Why Can’t I Touch It?’  for today’s tribute to Pete Shelley. This was originally a B-side to the equally epic ‘Everybody’s Happy Nowadays’. The following writers were given credit for this song – Diggle, Steve GarveyJohn Maher, Shelley – which probably means Shelley only had a minor role in the collaboration of this record. Nevertheless, he undeniably made it his own with his trademark vocals.

Writing on the All Music website, Bill Janovitz describes this song in the following manner:

A reggae shuffle of sorts forms the rhythmic basis of this infectious pop tune from the Buzzcocks. While most of the band’s songs were infused with a healthy dose of punk rock energy and aggression, “Why Can’t I Touch It?” is a relaxed, albeit angular groove. The song approaches punk only by way of the Clash’s penchant for Caribbean beats and dub-style production/arranging and perhaps Pete Shelley’s astringent, high-register vocal delivery.