Save the Welsh Independent Living Grant

Minutes from Petitions Committee #SaveWILG

The #SaveWILG campaign is very disappointed that the Petitions Committee failed to move towards writing a report on the petition to reconsider the closure of the Welsh Independent Living Grant.

Urgent action is required now as people continue to struggle as I know only too well. Last night I was awake from 03:00 onwards as I needed to use the urinal, could not grab the paracetamol that I needed to ease the pain in my legs and I had to struggle to get my phone that had slid under my back during a restless sleep. All these problems would have been easily prevented if I had adequate 24/7 care to allow me to live independently in the community like I deserve.

The Petitions Committee – who have been supportive so far – need to remember that there are over 1000 disabled people struggling throughout Wales who are dependant on them taking quick and decisive action.
***
Dear Petitioner
 
Please note that the actions following the Committee’s meeting have been posted on the Petitions webpage:
 
English:
 
If you have any queries – contact me.
 
Regards
Petitions Committee
***

Minutes:

The Committee considered correspondence from a number of stakeholders and agreed to write to the Minister for Children, Older People and Social Care to:

  • seek a detailed update on the progress of the transition arrangements to date including the outcome of the review of all support needs which was due to be completed by the end of September; and
  • ask whether, as a middle way between ring-fencing and funding through the Revenue Support Grant, he will consider requiring local authorities to provide a report detailing actual expenditure on care packages for previous recipients of the Welsh Independent Living Grant, including the number of recipients, the average amount received per person and the total amount awarded.

 

Progress on Disability Rights in the United Kingdom #SaveWILG

Yesterday, I was alerted to the publication of UK Independent mechanism update report to the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

This is a very illuminating document that shows just how far behind the United Kingdom is slipping in terms of Disability Rights. The sections about Independent Living is of particular interest to me and my comrades as it is critical of the current arrangements that we are having to put up with. It provides yet more evidence of the need to save WILG as well as some worrying news that the Welsh Government are rushing through a new framework on Independent Living for disabled people that is bound to be a huge disappointment to those with high care and support needs. Welsh Labour have proved time and again that they do not want to listen to party members, unions, Labour MP’s, supporters from across the political spectrum or some of their own politicians and are determined to stop WILG.

I am doing everything I can but I am not being listened to at all.  I have been robbed of three years of my life and the effect of this campaign has taken a huge toll on my health.

I will carry on the fight until the bitter end because I believe in what I am fighting for and have no confidence in the Welsh Government – as it stands – to produce a suitable alternative.

The fight continues…

*** 

The section on Wales, reads as follows:

Wales –

The EHRC is concerned that disabled people’s right to independent living may be harmed by the Welsh Government’s decision to potentially merge the Supporting People programme with other budget lines from 2020. Concerns have been raised that disabled people’s rights have been negatively affected when equivalent funding programmes elsewhere in the UK have been lost. 

The report goes on to say the following:

Wales

The Welsh Government has prioritised social care in budget allocations to local
authorities since 2010, most recently through a local government settlement to
maintain the assumed Welsh Government share of core spending at 2017/18 levels
until 2020. The Welsh Government also provides funding that supports social care
duties through the Supporting People programme. This support helps people to live
independently in their own home. The programme has been retained for a further
two years as part of the budget for 2018/19. The programme’s future post-2019 is
unclear, with the Welsh Government potentially merging it with nine other budget
lines, with no ring fencing, causing concern for disabled people. A £60 million
integrated care fund has been introduced, which aims to support people to maintain their independence and remain in their own home. However, there has been a real terms reduction in budgets for social care services of over 12% due to increasing need.

The Welsh Government is currently reviewing its Framework for Action on
Independent Living. After a delay, it is anticipated that the new framework, provisionally entitled ‘Action on disability: The right to independent living’, will now be published in autumn 2018. The new framework will be accompanied by an action plan that will set out a range of actions aimed at tackling some of the key barriers identified by disabled people, including in transport, employment and housing, and access to buildings and public spaces.

I am looking forward to seeing what this new framework for action actually entails. I am preparing to be disappointed as  I always am with shambolic Welsh Labour.

***

The full report on the Right to Independent Living can be seen below:

2. The right to live independently in the community (article 19)

CRPD Committee concluding observations 2017, paragraph 45:

‘The Committee recommends that the State party … : recognise the right to living
independently and being included in the community as a subjective right,
recognise the enforce ability of all its elements, and adopt rights-based policies,
regulations and guidelines to ensure implementation; conduct periodic
assessments in close consultation with organisations of persons with disabilities
to address and prevent the negative effects of policy reforms through sufficiently
funded and appropriate strategies in the area of social support and living
independently; … [and] allocate sufficient resources to ensure that support
services are available, accessible, affordable, acceptable, adaptable and are
sensitive to different living conditions for all persons with disabilities in urban and
rural areas.’

Summary of progress

There has been limited progress on the UK governments’ implementation of the
CRPD Committee’s recommendations concerning disabled people’s right to live
independently in the community. Appropriate social care packages and accessible
housing are two of the cornerstones of independent living. There have been some
promising developments in Scotland and Wales in relation to certain funding streams
to support independent living. However, as set out below, there is also evidence that
social care, particularly adult social care, is at crisis point across the UK and there is
a chronic shortage of accessible homes.

Progress on disability rights in the United Kingdom 

Key concerns

UK

The right to live independently in the community is not recognised as a statutory right
in the UK and there do not appear to be any plans to change this.
The increasing demand, along with reduced funding, for social care, particularly adult
social care, may be leading to a regression in disabled people’s article 19 rights to
live independently in the community. The shortage of accessible and adaptable
homes, and long delays in making existing homes accessible, also has a detrimental
effect on the right to live independently.

England

The EHRC is concerned that, in England, the closure of the Independent Living Fund
and the devolution of this function to local authorities, without ring-fencing finance for
this purpose, has resulted in a postcode lottery for support.

Wales

The EHRC is concerned that disabled people’s right to independent living may be
harmed by the Welsh Government’s decision to potentially merge the Supporting
People programme with other budget lines from 2020.
Concerns have been raised that disabled people’s rights have been negatively
affected when equivalent funding programmes elsewhere in the UK have been lost.

Northern Ireland

The Mental Capacity Act (Northern Ireland) 2016, while enacted, continues to have
no clear time frame for its commencement.

In Northern Ireland, the Independent Living Fund is administered by the Independent
Living Fund Scotland, but restricted to existing users leading to its eventual defacto
closure, and with no clear indication of future arrangements.

Scotland

Despite positive policy intentions, significant questions remain regarding the
implementation of Self-directed Support and access to adult social care.

New evidence

Great Britain

The EHRC’s inquiry into housing for disabled people across Great Britain (GB),
published in May 2018, found that disabled people face a shortage of accessible and
adaptable homes and long delays in making existing homes accessible. Disabled
people are not getting the support they need to live independently as the provision of
advice, support and advocacy is patchy, and people report that they have nowhere
to turn when their housing is unsuitable. The EHRC’s survey of local authorities
found that just over a quarter (28%) of local authorities in GB set a percentage target
for accessible housing.

 In England, only 7% of homes offer minimal accessibility features.

 In Scotland, 55% of councils said a lack of funding for adaptations was a
challenge, and only 24% said the data they hold about disabled people’s
housing requirements were ‘good’ or ‘very good’.

 In Wales, only 5% of local authorities have a target in place for accessible
housing, and only 15% said that disabled people’s housing needs are subject
to specific discussion or scrutiny when conducting a local housing market
assessment.

Progress on disability rights in the United Kingdom

England
Spending for adult social care in England was budgeted to be 3% lower in 2017/18
than in 2009/10. As the population has grown over this period, this is equivalent to
9% lower per person, according to the Association of Directors of Adult Social
Services (ADASS). This means ‘fewer older and disabled people with more complex
care and support needs getting less long-term care’.

In March 2018, the EHRC started legal action against 13 clinical commissioning
groups because their NHS Continuing Healthcare policies restricted funding and
failed to account for individual circumstances. This may force disabled people into
residential care when their preference is to remain at home.

Research by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) found that nearly two-thirds of placements in residential-based mental health rehabilitation services are ‘out of area’, and very lengthy. This means that individuals are usually placed far away both from home and from the local support services that should care for them once they have been discharged. The CQC has also reported that some patients who are subject to the Mental Health Act (MHA) 1983 continue to experience care that does not fully protect their rights or ensure their well-being. For example, there have been no improvements in involving patients in developing their care plans, and in making sure their views are considered in care decisions.

Northern Ireland
There is an absence of information on the extent to which disabled people with
substantive needs, who are not existing Independent Living Fund users, are having their needs met through the Self-directed Support and direct payment provisions. Furthermore, direct payments do not fund many of the activities funded by the
Independent Living Fund, leading to less support and control.

Indicator 42 of the draft ‘programme for government’ considers the average life
satisfaction score of disabled people. The Department for Communities has
acknowledged that the comprehensive dis-aggregated data required to support
indicator 42 is lacking. The department has conducted a scoping study to identify
existing data, which recommended that a new Northern Ireland disability survey is
required. The department is exploring options for such a survey, but, due to the
additional resources required to conduct the survey, ministerial approval is required.
With the continued suspension of the Northern Ireland devolved government, it is
currently not possible to obtain the required approval.

Relevant steps taken by UK governments

England

Since 2015, the UK Government has allocated additional funding to local authorities
for adult social care through the adult social care precept, the Better Care Fund
and a commitment to fund an adult social care support grant. However,
stakeholders, including ADASS, conclude that even these recent increases may not
be enough to address the funding crisis in adult social care.

In March 2017, the Conservative Government announced a green paper on social
care in England, and a public consultation. The publication of the green paper, which
will focus on older people, has been delayed until the end of 2018. It is unclear whether it will address issues that are faced by working-age disabled people in
relation to social care, and whether disabled people will be explicitly consulted.

England and Wales

The independent review of the MHA 1983 published its interim report in May 2018,
providing details of the issues the review is examining.These include the rising
rates of people being detained under the act and inappropriate and/or long-term
placement of people with learning disabilities and/or autism in psychiatric hospitals
because community support services are unable to meet their needs. The EHRC
hopes that the review will make recommendations that result in fewer people facing
compulsory detention and more people living independently in places or with people
of their choosing.

Wales

The Welsh Government has prioritised social care in budget allocations to local
authorities since 2010, most recently through a local government settlement to
maintain the assumed Welsh Government share of core spending at 2017/18 levels
until 2020. The Welsh Government also provides funding that supports social care
duties through the Supporting People programme. This support helps people to live
independently in their own home. The programme has been retained for a further
two years as part of the budget for 2018/19. The programme’s future post-2019 is
unclear, with the Welsh Government potentially merging it with nine other budget
lines, with no ring fencing, causing concern for disabled people. A £60 million
integrated care fund has been introduced, which aims to support people to maintain
their independence and remain in their own home. However, there has been a real
terms reduction in budgets for social care services of over 12% due to increasing
need.

The Welsh Government is currently reviewing its Framework for Action on
Independent Living. After a delay, it is anticipated that the new framework provisionally entitled ‘Action on disability: The right to independent living’, will now be
published in autumn 2018. The new framework will be accompanied by an action
plan that will set out a range of actions aimed at tackling some of the key barriers
identified by disabled people, including in transport, employment and housing, and
access to buildings and public spaces.

Northern Ireland

The draft programme for government indicator 42 includes a commitment to
increase take-up of Self-directed Support and direct payments. However, a final plan
has yet to be approved in the absence of a functioning Northern Ireland Executive.
Concerns have been raised that Self-directed Support does not suit everyone, that
too much control is given to the health trusts, and that the support given is not
enough to be used for more than the individual recipient’s basic needs.

In the absence of an approved programme for government, the Northern Ireland
Executive Office has developed a 2018/19 outcomes delivery plan that reflects the
responsibilities placed on departments by the previous NI Assembly and Northern
Ireland Executive, and sets out actions that the departments can take without further
ministerial approval. Outcomes 8 (care and help for those in need) and 9 (a shared,
welcoming and confident society that respects diversity) include a commitment to
improve quality of life for disabled people. The identified actions for fulfilling these
outcomes include ensuring that 8% of new social homes are wheelchair accessible,
introducing opportunities for 200 new NI athletes in the Special Olympics, and
improving understanding of British Sign Language and Irish Sign Language.
Progress will be measured every six months, using a number of indicators set out in
the draft programme for government, including indicator 42. Questions have been
raised in particular regarding the plans for new accessible social homes and whether
an 8% target for new accessible social homes is reflective of demand. It has also
been questioned whether the new accessible social homes will be provided in a way
that addresses the demand in rural and urban areas.

Scotland

The Scottish Government has announced funding for 31 projects delivering direct
and local independent support across 31 local authority areas, through the Support
in the Right Direction 2021 programme. Funding will be provided between October
2018 and March 2021, with the aim of ensuring that more people across Scotland
who require social care are empowered to make choices about their support.

The Scottish Government has confirmed that by 1 April 2019 it will extend free
personal care to all those under the age of 65 who require it, regardless of their
condition.

Motion for Disability Labour AGM #SaveWILG

This is the motion I am proposing at the Disability Labour AGM on Saturday 8th September in Leeds.

Thanks must go to Keith Sinclair for his amazing work on creating this motion. The strength of the #SaveWILG campaign group never fails to impress me. It is very humbling.

***

Disability Labour notes:

  • the support for the Welsh Independent Living Grant (WILG) from recipients and the wider support that exists.

 

  • that a positive approach must include a tripartite team to agree the Care Package, comprising the disabled individual, the local authority and a Social Worker independent of both parties.

 

  • the decision of the Welsh Government to abolish the WILG

 

  • the overwhelming decision of the Wales Labour Party conference to support the saving of the Welsh Independent Living Grant (WILG)

 

  • the different approaches that have been adopted to supporting Independent Living in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

 

Disability Labour believes

  • that the approach to Independent Living adopted in England has been a disaster and that the models adopted in Scotland and North Ireland are more likely to meets the needs of disabled people.

 

  • that Constituency Labour Parties (CLPs) and trade unions in Wales should be congratulated for their support for the campaign to save the WILG.

 

  • that the evidence is clear that local authorities in Wales are not in a position to seamlessly take on the responsibilities of the WILG.

Disability Labour calls upon

  • the Welsh Government to save the WILG as a first step towards meeting the needs of disabled people in Wales

 

  • CLPS, unions and Labour affiliates to support the campaign to save the WILG.

 

Proposed by Nathan Lee Davies

Seconded by Dorian Gordon

 

 

Little Bit of This, Little Bit of That…

‘111Wine, beer aNd SPIRits kEEP mE DoWn

 

liberty
ˈlɪbəti/
noun
  1. 1.
    the state of being free within society from oppressive restrictions imposed by authority on one’s behaviour or political views.
    “compulsory retirement would interfere with individual liberty”

 

Hi

I will get back to you properly tomorrow evening due to my poor dexterity and lack of care hours provided to me by Wrexham Council.

I am locked in a world of frustration that prohibits the speed at which I can type my thoughts, although my mind is racing as fast as ever.

I hope all is well with you and I look forward to speaking properly when I have adequate support available.

 

 

Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC) is about disabled people and their allies. DPAC is UK based but we know that disabled people in other countries are suffering from austerity cuts and a lack of fundamental rights.
We welcome all to join us in fighting for justice and human rights for all disabled people. Disabled people should not be the scapegoats for the financial mistakes of governments, should not be constantly told that there is no money to support them by millionaire politicians. We will not tolerate further erosion of our living conditions or our human rights, nor will we sit quietly while they try to take our rights away.
DPAC was formed by a group of disabled people after the 3rd October 2010 mass protests against cuts in Birmingham, England. The 3rd October saw the first mass protest against the austerity cuts and their impact on disabled people-It was led by disabled people under the name of The Disabled Peoples’ Protest. DPAC co-founders are the original Disabled Peoples’ Protest organisers. Leading coordinator Linda Burnip was instrumental in getting disabled peoples’ voices heard and disabled people represented at the protest, along with, Sam Brackenbury, Bob Williams- Finlay, Tina Hogg, Debbie Jolly, Eleanor Lisney, Pete Millington, Dave Lupton, and most important of all: all those that DPAC does not necessarily agree with comments or remarks posted by other parties and will continue to publish them unless they contain any comments that are deemed offensive, inappropriate or include information that might be viewed as legally harmful.
The Wrexham branch of DPAC aims to tackle all disability related issues in North East Wales, especially those created by Governmental bodies and crooked Councillors. It is time that people valued disabled people and see the potential that exists with this group of people.

 

 

RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS NOT CHARITY, RIGHTS

 

FIGHTBACK STARTS HERE

TIME TO TURN THE TABLES

DON’T WORRY – The moral high ground is ours.

Genetics[edit]

Friedreich’s ataxia has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.

Friedreich’s ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder that occurs when the FXN gene on chromosome 9 contains amplified intronic GAA repeats (an example of Trinucleotide repeat expansion). The FXN gene encodes the protein frataxin.[4] GAA repeat expansion causes frataxin levels to be reduced and long tracts of GAA repeats induce chromosome breaks in (in vivo yeast studies). Frataxin is an iron-binding protein responsible for forming iron–sulphur clusters. One result of frataxin deficiency is mitochondrial iron overload which can cause damage to many proteins.[4] The exact role of frataxin in normal physiology remains unclear.[5]

 

42https://www.change.org/p/everyone-allow-disabled-people-freedom-to-travel-on-trains?recruiter=62711042&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=psf_combo_share_initial.pacific_abi_share_button_ordering_1.abi_featured_fb&utm_term=psf_combo_share_initial.pacific_abi_share_button_ordering_1.abi_featured_fb

Media Articles

‘I will spend what remains of my life fighting this if I have to’ – Disabled man’s battle for grant to live independently

Wales Live, BBC One Wales, 09/05/2018

Welsh Government under pressure over disabled grant

Disabled man continues fight for independent lives in Flintshire and Wrexham

This disabled man has lost half his care after Tories axed the Independent Living Fund

Welsh Government has ‘sold disabled people down the river’

Independent living grants: Disability campaigner fear cuts

i OnLy WaNtEd 2 b LoVeD

 

David Melding @DavidMeldingAM

Lynne Neagle @lynne_neagle

Gareth Bennett AC/AM @GarethBennettAM

David Rowlands AC/AMVerified account @DavidRowlandsAM

Hefin David AC/AM @hef4caerphilly

Caroline Jones AC/AM @carolineUKIP

Dr Dai Lloyd AC/AM @DaiLloydAM

Carl Sargeant AM @Carl4AandD Michelle Brown AM @MishBrownAM

Carwyn Jones AM/ACVerified account @AMCarwyn

Joyce Watson AM @JoyceWatsonam

Nathan GillVerified account @NathanGillMEP

Neil Hamilton AC/AMVerified account @NeilUKIP

John Griffiths AM @JGriffithsLab

Vikki Howells AM @VikkiHowells

Ann Jones AM @ann_jonesam

David Rees @DavidReesAM

Neil McEvoy AM @neiljmcevoy

Ken Skates AMVerified account @KenSkatesAM

Dafydd Elis-Thomas @ElisThomasD

MickAntoniw AM @MickAntoniw1

Jayne Bryant AM @JBryantWales

Mike Hedges @MikeHedgesAM

Julie James AMVerified account @JulieJamesAM

Rebecca Evans AMVerified account @RebeccaEvansAM

Eluned Morgan @Eluned_Morgan

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Rhianon Passmore @rhi4islwyn

Elin Jones @ElinCeredigion

Vaughan Gething AMVerified account @vaughangething

Mark Drakeford AMVerified account @MarkDrakeford

Mark Isherwood AMVerified account @MarkIsherwoodAM

Angela Burns @AngelaBurnsAM

Mohammad Asghar AMVerified account @MohammadAsghar

Lesley GriffithsVerified account @lesley4wrexham

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Huw Irranca-DaviesAMVerified account @huw4ogmore

Russell George AMVerified account @russ_george

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Julie MorganVerified account @JulieMorganLAB

Sian Gwenllian AC/AM @siangwenfelin

Janet Finch-SaundersVerified account @JFinchSaunders

Lee Waters AMVerified account @Amanwy

Alun DaviesVerified account @AlunDaviesAM

Jeremy Miles AC/AMVerified account @Jeremy_Miles

Jenny Rathbone AMVerified account @JennyRathbone

Mark Reckless AMVerified account @MarkReckless

Dawn Bowden AM @Dawn_Bowden

Llyr Gruffydd AC/AM @LlyrGruffydd

suzy daviesVerified account @suzydaviesam

Darren Millar AMVerified account @DarrenMillarAM

Steffan LewisVerified account @steffanlewis

Adam PriceVerified account @Adamprice

Hannah Blythyn AM @hannahblythyn

Kirsty WilliamsVerified account @Kirsty_Williams

LeanneWoodVerified account @LeanneWood

Bethan Maeve AM/ACVerified account @bethanjenkins

 

 

 

Is YOUR work of ANY intrinsic value at all?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide

 

The trouble is not that I am single and likely to stay single, but that I am lonely and likely to stay lonely.—Charlotte Brontë

Plaid Cymru AM Issues Statement of Opinion #SaveWILG

Plaid Cymru AM, Llyr Gruffydd has released the following Statement of Opinion to the delight of everyone working on the #SaveWILG campaign:

OPIN-2018-0094 The future of the Welsh Independent Living Grant
Tabled on 18/06/2018

This Assembly:

1. Notes the cuts suffered by local authorities over recent years, and the squeeze on social services budgets across Wales.

2. Further notes that article 19 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities states how people with disabilities should have “choices equal to others”. 

3. Commends the Scottish Government on introducing a successful Independent Living Fund that is trusted and has a national criteria. 

4. Believes that the Welsh Independent Living Grant should be retained as a national funding package with a national criteria, ensuring the recipients independence, along the lines of ILF Scotland.

Subscribers

Adam Price – Carmarthen East and Dinefwr

Sian Gwenllian – Arfon

***

A Statement of Opinion on a matter affecting Wales may be tabled by any Member other than a member of the government; and any such Statement may be supported, opposed or otherwise subject to comment in writing by any other Member. Statements of Opinion are published on the Assembly website but there is no Assembly decision on them.

 

 

We need people power to save the Welsh Independent Living Grant #SaveWILG

ARTICLE TAKEN FROM MORNING STAR

CAMPAIGN OF THE WEEK

21078726_10154722308036363_5534228607813332174_n

CARE for disabled people who live on their own was jeopardised by the Tories in 2015 when they scrapped the Independent Living Fund (ILF).

The scheme helped people who had both day and night care needs and who were getting the high rate care component of Disability Living Allowance.

In England, the funds were given directly to local authorities, but in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland the money was transferred to the devolved governments.

Scotland and Northern Ireland set up their own ILF systems and Wales created the Welsh Independent Living Grant (WILG) as an interim measure while a consultation took place.

In November 2016, the Welsh government announced that it would be closing WILG and giving the money directly to local authorities through the Revenue Support Grant.

Save the Welsh Independent Living Grant’s (SaveWILG) Nathan Lee Davies says it means the money will not be “ring-fenced” and is concerned that councils can spend the money “in whatever way they choose,” meaning disabled people’s needs could be overlooked.

“As a recipient, I do not believe that all the options were seriously considered,” he says.

“Disabled people and their families have been let down by the Welsh government who cannot be allowed to wash their hands of their responsibility to some of the most vulnerable people in our society.

“WILG is a grant that needs improvement, but we are hoping to save it in order to preserve the remnants of the ILF.”

The campaign group, as titled, aims to save the WILG and allow disabled people with high care and support needs to live the lives that they choose with adequate support.

Davies says: “It is important that we keep hold of the triangular system that was so successful during the ILF years when packages of care were designed in between recipients, local authorities and independent organisations.

“The final care package could be only be agreed and finalised when all three parties were in agreement.

“Disabled people cannot afford to depend on cash-cutting local authorities. Once we have ensured the future of WILG our next steps would be to improve it.”

SaveWILG began with a petition and by handing out postcards to members of the public to pose with.

“We managed to get a postcard photo with Ken Loach and comedian Mark Thomas,” says Davies.

“I have been writing letters to the petitions committee at the Welsh Assembly and we recently won a motion at the Welsh Labour conference in Llandudno to save WILG.

Unfortunately, AM Huw Irranca-Davies announced that the Welsh government would not be changing its policy following the conference, which Davies says “ignores the will” of members and unions.

The original motion started off at the Wrexham branch of Unite and soon SaveWILG also won the support of Unison.

“The fact that we won the vote so convincingly suggests that other unions also supported us, despite the Welsh executive committee asking Clwyd South to retract the motion,” Davies says.

Davies is working closely with Welsh Labour Grassroots and receives support from the People’s Assembly and Left Unity.

“It was a great day, but we must guard against complacency and finish the job we have started,” he adds.

“The fact that we managed to meet Jeremy Corbyn at conference and get a photograph of him holding a ‘Where there’s a WILG, there’s a way T-shirt’ was also a highlight.”

The campaign is still ongoing and Davies says that he has learnt that “people power” can really make a difference.

He says: “We have a wealth of future events planned, such as protests and marches, and on June 5 we are going to the Senedd to give evidence to the petitions committee.

“We will continue to put pressure on the Welsh government until there is independent living and disability rights.”