Disability Arts Cymru

List Poem: Living with Ataxia

Disability Arts Cymru have introduced me to the amazing Sophie McKeand – the gifted writer, poet, performer who is the current Young People’s Laureate Wales April 2016 – 2018, winner of the Out Spoken award for Innovation in Poetry 2015 and longlisted for the Poetry Society’s National Poetry Competition in 2014.

Writing about the incredible collection of poetry, Rebel Sun, by McKeand, Martha Sprackland [me neither] says:

“This is mythological, musical poetry that not only crosses borders but seems to dismantle them entirely, collapsing time and space, transfiguring and prefiguring the world we live in.”

I have a signed copy and can confirm the books brilliance.

Anyway, Sophie is an admirer of my Tanka work and has encouraged me to try different poetic forms such as the List Poem below. I was fortunate enough to perform a list poem alongside Sophie at the #SaveWILG community awareness day at Set the Bar in February.

This was a resounding success and gave me the belief in my talent that I needed. It also led to further ideas for more poems such as the one written below. Maybe I can perform this in future with Sophie as I think we made a good pairing. Sophie is an esteemed poet in her own right so she probably doesn’t want me hanging around like a bad smell, but I think that I should maybe be looking for a person to complete my double act. I need an Ant for my Dec.

Anyway, here is my latest list poem:

Introduction: Music of this type will be created and performed as a backdrop to the introduction phase of the poem. This will be narrated by a third party.  

Friedreich’s ataxia is an autosomal recessive inherited disease that causes progressive damage to the nervous system. It manifests in initial symptoms of poor coordination such as gait disturbance; it can also lead to scoliosis, heart disease and diabetes, but does not affect cognitive function. The disease is progressive, and ultimately a wheelchair is required for mobility. Its incidence in the general population is roughly 1 in 50,000.

The ataxia of Friedreich’s ataxia results from the degeneration of nervous tissue in the spinal cord, in particular sensory neurons essential (through connections with the cerebellum) for directing muscle movement of the arms and legs. The spinal cord becomes thinner and nerve cells lose some of their myelin sheath (the insulating covering on some nerve cells that helps conduct nerve impulses).

The condition is named after the German physician Nikolaus Friedreich, who first described it in the 1860s.[1]

Symptoms typically begin sometime between the ages of 5 to 15 years, but in Late Onset FA may occur in the 20s or 30s. Symptoms include any combination, but not necessarily all, of the following:

It presents before 22 years of age with progressive staggering or stumbling gait and frequent falling. Lower extremities are more severely involved. The symptoms are slow and progressive. Long-term observation shows that many patients reach a plateau in symptoms in the patient’s early adulthood. On average, after 10–15 years with the disease, patients are usually wheelchair bound and require assistance with all activities of daily living.[3] 

[The lines in italics throughout the poem are to be spoken by different people dressed in appropriate clothing and illuminated on a dark stage by a spot light]

Living with Ataxia

Is a struggle

Living with Ataxia

Sounds muffled and unclear

Living with Ataxia

Smells of wet denim and shame

Living with Ataxia

Tastes of bitterness

Living with Ataxia

Feels brittle

Living with Ataxia

Wibble wobble, wibble wobble jelly on a plate

Living with Ataxia

Effects everyone around you

Living with Ataxia

Leaves you wondering what might have been

Living with Ataxia

Demands formidable mental strength

Living with Ataxia

Beats being programmed by The Man From Auntie 

Living with Ataxia

Could be the best thing that ever happened [discounting Maggie’s demise]

Living with Ataxia

“He’s just lazy and clumsy”

Living with Ataxia

Means wanting what you can’t have

Living with Ataxia

Forbids carnal delights

Living with Ataxia

Limits your liberty

Living with Ataxia

Allows your imagination to run rampant

Living with Ataxia

Prevents the attainment of Aquarian ambitions

Living with Ataxia

“Trampoline legs”

Living with Ataxia

Colours your life

Living with Ataxia

Black, dark grey or midnight blue

Living with Ataxia

Is not all bad [he lied]

Living with Ataxia

Results in a dark sense of humour

Living with Ataxia

Is no laughing matter

Living with Ataxia

“Sorry sir, I forgot my kit”

Living with Ataxia

Adds fuck all

Living with Ataxia

Subtracts hope

Living with Ataxia

Divides friends and family

Living with Ataxia

Multiplies hurdles

Living with Ataxia

“Maybe it’s a trapped nerve”

Living with Ataxia

Confuses small minds

Living with Ataxia

Frustrates 

Living with Ataxia

Embarrasses

Living with Ataxia

Teaches you virtues, such as “Good things come to those who wait”

Living with Ataxia

Makes you wonder who the fuck wrote virtues?

Living with Ataxia

“Have you got a licence for that?”

Living with Ataxia

Highlights injustice

Living with Ataxia

Illustrates that beauty isn’t only skin deep [thank God]

Living with Ataxia

Condemns you to a life less ordinary

Living with Ataxia

Contradicts

Living with Ataxia

Imposes barriers around ghostly souls

Living with Ataxia

“Sorry, only genetically perfect people can donate sperm”

Living with Ataxia

Did I mention it’s a struggle?

Living with Ataxia

Underlines inequality

Living with Ataxia

Objectifies the body

Living with Ataxia

Mystifies my mixed up mind

Living with Ataxia

Disqualifies true contenders to the crown

Living with Ataxia

“I charge by the hour hun

Living with Ataxia

Locks lively minds in dying bodies

Living with Ataxia

Mangles the idea of perfection

Living with Ataxia

Twists the spine

Living with Ataxia

Causes caustic sorrow

Living with Ataxia

“Fill your pockets chaps. These disabled freaks are easy targets”

Living with Ataxia

Suffocates the soul

Living with Ataxia

Haunts empty shells

Living with Ataxia

Implodes

Living with Ataxia

Crushes everything that’s precious

Living with Ataxia

Guess what? It’s a fucking struggle

#SaveWILG Art Exhibition

The #SaveWILG art exhibition took place at Theatr Clwyd in Mold between January 24th and February 12th. I have included photographs of the art below although these pictures do not give the overall effect of the exhibition, as the Gallery space we were provided with includes large windows which caused sunlight to reflect on the framed artwork. This made capturing perfect photos very difficult.

I also include a YouTube video that illustrates the wealth of support that we received for our postcard campaign. This was shown on a large screen in the Gallery.

Following a conversation with Ted Eames, I have approached Lesley Griffiths, AM for Wrexham, to ask if she could arrange for the exhibition to be shown in the Senedd. She agreed in principle and I hope we can come to some arrangement quickly as time is of the essence.

Overall, the exhibition at Theatr Clwyd was a great success. Thanks are due to Disability Arts Cymru – especially Lowri-Mair Owen – Theatr Clwyd and everyone who visited the show. In particular, I want to thank Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson for their outstanding contributions in helping me create such a production. The input of David Nulty, Amy Lockhurst, Sophie Morris, Ted Eames, Grace Currie, Sophia Leadill and Georgina Gittins was also crucial to the success of this project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YouTube Link – SaveWILG Film

Obviously these photographs do not do our exhibition any credit at all, but I have included them to give you a taste of what we have achieved. I am very proud of the exhibition and hope we can show it to all Assembly Members in the Senedd to help educate and inform them about the importance of maintaining WILG in the first place, before establishing a fairer system that will enable all disabled people to benefit from the right to independent living.

I have not added the artist names alongside these photographs as I would encourage you to try to attend this exhibition wherever it may appear next to get a full flavour of what has been achieved. Thanks to Julie Rogers-Owen for providing the photographs used above.

Switch Off Your TV Set

Haiku is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature. A Haiku consists of 3 lines and 17 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables

Regular readers of this blog will know that I have put together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I will publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, utilising the team of illustrators I have assembled to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 24th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd in Mold, north Wales. It will continue until February 12th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter. Everyone is welcome to the official media launch of the event on February 2nd at 3pm at Theatr Clwyd.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.

Locked in struggle

While you mindless idiots

Feed on distractions

How to Lose Friends and Alienate People

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

Regular readers of this blog will know that I have put together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I will publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, utilising the team of illustrators I have assembled to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd in Mold, north Wales. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.


Use your silver spoon

To stir up old prejudice

Spread lies and divide

Power and fortune is yours

Eternal damnation waits…

The Independent: Toby Young’s appointment to board of higher education watchdog sparks criticism

You’re Never Going to Keep Me Down

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 150th poem of 2017 and I have now put together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I will publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, utilising the team of illustrators I have assembled to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd in Mold, north Wales. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.

Looks like you made it

Limping in at the finish

With your pride intact

Battered, betrayed and broken

Set to fight another day

Follow the Script

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 149th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.

I, Nathan Davies

Can relate to your story

Of pure frustration

Held back by the damn system

Until the end credits roll

Survival of the Richest

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 148th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.

 

Our society

Full of  wireless fizz, bang, pop

Magical gadgets

That make your lives easier

While strangers sleep on the streets