Staff Wanted

I am in search of new staff to work alongside me as a personal assistant. This is a fulfilling role that gives you the chance to make a difference to someone else’s life. I am looking for someone who is punctual, reliable, a team player and can be flexible.

Drop me a line via the Contact page, Facebook or Twitter. Good luck.

***

Female Personal Assistant (Sex Discrimination Act Section 7 (2) (b) (ii) applies, Wrexham (0103) Rate of Pay: Weekdays £7.56 per hour – Weekend Enhanced £10.04 Weekly Hours: TBC

About the employer:

This post is to support a sociable 40-year-old man living in the Wrexham area. He is wheelchair-bound and lives with Fredrichs Ataxia. Subsequently he requires support to remain independent. An intelligent Author and disabled activist with a good sense of humour, he remains ambitious and adventurous. He enjoys company and likes to go out socialising.

Summary of duties:

To provide support to access various social and recreational activities. You must therefore have a clean driving license. You will need to support with his personal care, including toileting, washing, dressing and preparing meals. He is a very creative individual and requires support to develop his ideas.

Support with gardening and household tasks.

The post will include 5.6 weeks paid annual leave (pro-rata)

Police records check funded by the employer will be required.

The person they are looking for:

The ideal person will have a good sense of humour and should also display plenty of energy, initiative and enthusiasm. In addition, applicants should be patient and trustworthy with a flexible and empathic attitude. A positive attitude and clear understanding of confidentiality is essential. Promoting the independence of the client will be the main focus for any support.

You must be reliable, friendly and punctual.

Times Required:

A variety of hours are available to cover Mornings, Evenings and Weekends. To be discussed at interview.

Holiday and Sickness Cover is also available.

 

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Survival of the Richest

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 148th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.

 

Our society

Full of  wireless fizz, bang, pop

Magical gadgets

That make your lives easier

While strangers sleep on the streets

List Poem: Modern Life is…

Disability Arts Cymru have introduced me to the amazing Sophie McKeand – the gifted writer, poet, performer who is the current Young People’s Laureate Wales April 2016 – 2018, winner of the Out Spoken award for Innovation in Poetry 2015 and longlisted for the Poetry Society’s National Poetry Competition in 2014.

Writing about the incredible collection of poetry, Rebel Sun, by McKeand, Martha Sprackland [me neither] says:

“This is mythological, musical poetry that not only crosses borders but seems to dismantle them entirely, collapsing time and space, transfiguring and prefiguring the world we live in.”

I have a signed copy and can confirm the books brilliance.

Anyway, Sophie is an admirer of my Tanka work and has encouraged me to try different poetic forms such as the List Poem below, which I hope to perform alongside Sophie in February. Details to follow.

This remains a work in progress as lines could be added or changed, with the line order also under review, but for a first effort I am happy with the rhythm. No wonder Sophie is impressed…

Modern life is

Driving to work in an electric car while drinking breakfast from a bottle

Modern life is

Smugly using satellite navigation allowing you to avoid the tailbacks

Modern life is

Taking a call from your Spouse on your watch – your child scooped the prize

Modern life is

An instantaneous response from Down Under

Modern life is

The wonder of Kit-Kat Bites Peanut Butter – what will they think of next?

Modern life is

Leaving your car in a blue badge bay because you can’t miss this meeting

Modern life is

Sterile

Modern life is

Eating Sushi with plastic cutlery at a business lunch in Wigan

Modern Life is

Saying one thing and meaning another

Modern life is

Balancing the books while searching for a magic money tree

Modern life is

Not having enough time to be ill

Modern life is

Futile

Modern life is

Knowing your place

Modern life is

Being fed sweet little lies

Modern life is

Not believing the truth

Modern life is

Postmodern

Modern life is

Celebrating yesterday while living in fear of tomorrow

Modern life is

2.4 children

Modern life is

Sickly sweet

Modern life is

Formulaic

Modern life is

Washed down with prosecco

Modern life is

So clichéd

Modern life is

So clichéd

Modern life is

Instantly forgettable

Modern life is

A mundane journey through mundane towns, proud to be home to a Tesco superstore

Modern life is

Forgetting where you are – Anytown

Modern life is

Devoid of any distinguishing features

Modern life is

Empty without social media

Modern life is

Forcing friendship with strangers that you pass on the street

Modern life is

Worthless without ‘likes’

Modern life is

Sanitised

Modern life is

Connected wirelessly

Modern life is

Checking your inbox for love

Modern life is

Finding messages from hard-up Nigerian Princes, robots selling Viagra and pimps offloading Russian Brides

Modern life is

Turning a blind eye to foreign sweat shops in return for cheap clothes

Modern life is

Ignoring homeless families begging for support on your way to the theatre

Modern life is

Political

Modern life is

Choosing sides

Modern life is

Divisive

Modern life is

Explosive

Modern life is

Extreme

Modern life is

Wishing you could pull a cracker

Modern life is

Watching MasterChef with a microwave meal

Modern life is

Battling with the Welsh Government for my liberty

Modern life is

Knowing that I’m different

Modern life is

Waiting for someone to see the beauty inside

Modern life is

Having more questions than answers

Modern life is

Unfinished

 

Meanwhile, back in the real world…

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 146th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson. Samples of their work can be found by clicking on their names. There are other artists involved but I do not have links to their work at the moment. I hope to rectify this soon.

Mistletoe and wine

A dangerous distraction

From the world’s problems

While the powerful plot plans

To destroy your way of life

 

Bucking the Fucking Trend

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 145th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are interested in collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson. Samples of their work can be found by clicking on their names. There are other artists involved but I do not have links to their work at the moment. I hope to rectify this soon.`

The principled man

Sits alone in the shadows

 Guarding his beliefs

While convention marches on

With predictable boredom

Memory Match – 02-05-98

Throughout the 2017/18 football season I will be contributing to the Wrexham AFC matchday programme. I will be penning a feature called Memory Match, a look back at classic Wrexham games from the past that I will share in this blog over the coming months.

This is the third successive season that I have been writing the Memory Match column. Indeed, when I have written a Memory Match for every Football League season that Wrexham AFC enjoyed,  I would like to compile all the columns into a book that will reflect the rich history of my beloved football club.

02-05-98

Southend United v Wrexham

League Division Two

Roots Hall

Result: 1-3

Southend United: Royce, Hails, Dublin, Roget (Harris), Coleman, Coulbault, Maher, Jones (Nielsen), Boere, Whyte, Clarke (Aldridge)

Goalscorer: Boere (12)

Wrexham: Marriott, McGregor, Hardy, Brammer (Owen), Humes, Carey, Chalk (Wainwright), Wilson, Spink, Roberts (Connolly), Ward.

Goalscorers: Ward (43, 86), Connolly (72)

Attendance: 4,247

The season hadn’t started well and only really came to life in February when improved displays earned Brian Flynn a Manager of the Month Award. After beating Millwall at the Racecourse in mid March, we entered the play off picture for the first time that season.

After two eighth placed finishes at the end of the previous two seasons, Wrexham were hoping to clinch a play-off place this time around, especially when you consider that during March they were third in the table and five points ahead of their nearest rivals.

However, the jitters then set in and we went on a disastrous run of eight league games without a victory. As a result, we needed to beat Southend United on the final day of the season, while hoping Bristol Rovers and Gillingham dropped points if we were to clinch the final play-off spot.

The Reds had a fantastic travelling support as always and they roared their team on in high spirits at Roots Hall. Wrexham obviously had to throw caution to the wind, but things did not start well when Jeroen Beore headed the home side ahead after only 12 minutes. This was the wake up call that our boys needed and we buckled down to try to make sure that we didn’t suffer another near miss.

Goalkeeper Andy Marriott was in great form with Brian Carey and Tony Humes providing him with rock solid cover at the heart of the defence. Peter Ward was another important figure in our strong spine. An outstanding display by the midfielder saw him curl a free-kick with his left foot past a helpless Simon Royce in the Shrimpers’ goal. This was an important strike as it came just two minutes before the break.

If only our spine had been completed with a potent goalscorer? Without any disrespect to Dean Spink or Neil Roberts, they were unlikely to grab the goals needed to fire us to promotion.

However, after the break the Robins raised their game and took the lead through Karl Connolly on 72 minutes. At this point it looked as if Wrexham would finish in the play-off zone but our hearts were broken over at the Memorial Stadium – home to Bristol Rovers – when the home side scored the odd goal in three against Brentford.

Ward grabbed his second with 4 minutes to go, but it was all academic by then

Assistant manager Kevin Reeves said: “There are a lot of dejected lads in our dressing room. They won 3-1, but it’s like a morgue in there. At one time we heard Bristol Rovers were only drawing, but when the final results came in it was like a dagger through the heart.”

***

The headline in the Leader stated that “Cup win eases play off pain” after we beat Newtown 0-2 (4-0 on aggregate) to reach the final of the first ever FAW International Cup. The journalist who came up with this article writes that “the result went some way to soften the blow of failing to qualify for the Division 2 play offs”. This was total nonsense of course as I don’t remember any scenes of joy and jubilation at Latham Park. Everyone was still gutted at missing a golden opportunity for promotion.

Two goals in a three minute spell – scored by Dean Spink and Mark Wilson – saw off the challenge of the League of Wales runners up Newtown to leave Brian Flynn’s men just 90 minutes away from tin-pot Cup glory and a cheque for £100,000.

Wrexham did win the competition after beating Cardiff City (2-1) in the final with goals from Mark Wilson and Gareth Owen, but fans could still be heard muttering “if only”….

Sour Times

Haiku is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature. A Haiku consists of 3 lines and 17 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables

This is my 23rd Haiku poem of 2017 and – along with the 121 Tanka poems I have written so far – I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are interested in collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson. Samples of their work can be found by clicking on their names. There are other artists involved but I do not have links to their work at the moment. I hope to rectify this soon.

After so many short poems I am itching to write a longer verse that is not restricted by the number of syllables permitted. I now have the confidence to take on this challenge that has been inspired by the poetry of John Cooper Clarke. I am also worried that I am beginning to repeat certain phrases and feel that I need to work from a fresh palate. I will still be producing Tanka and Haiku poems, but feel the time is right to explore other forms of poetry.

Dreams do not come true

If they did, I wouldn’t be here

Stuck in this nightmare