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To read the above story online, click here.

I have been in the Leader newspaper many times and used to write for them, but this is the first time that I have managed to get on the front page.

 

 

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Memory Match – 05-11-27

Throughout the 2017/18 football season I will be contributing to the Wrexham AFC matchday programme. I will be penning a feature called Memory Match, a look back at classic Wrexham games from the past that I will share in this blog over the coming months.

This is the third successive season that I have been writing the Memory Match column. Indeed, when I have written a Memory Match for every Football League season that Wrexham AFC enjoyed,  I would like to compile all the columns into a book that will reflect the rich history of my beloved football club.

05-11-27

Wrexham v Ashington

League Division Three (Northern Section)

Racecourse Ground

Result: 5-1

Wrexham: Robson, Jones, Crompton, Regan, Bellis, Graham, Longmuir, Rogers, Smith, Woodhouse, Gunson

Goalscorers: Rogers (2), Smith (3)

Ashington: Ridley, Robson, Best, Carlton, Price, Grieves, Hopper, Noble , Graham, Watson, Randall

Goalscorer: Randall

Attendance: 3,531

Wrexham had started the season strongly. After beating Stockport County at the Racecourse in September they topped the table for a week at least. In the run up to this game, they had fallen to fifth position, but were very much still looking upwards at a promotion tilt.

Ashington may be a new name to many of you. They are based in Northumberland and can claim to be the most northerly team to have played in the Football League. At the time of our encounter with them in the Third Division (North) they were struggling at the foot of the table and only managed to survive for another season at this level. In 1928/29 they lost their bid for re-election after finishing rock bottom. They were replaced by York City.

Remarkably, Ashington had yet to win a league game in 1927/28, so Wrexham were firm favourites. Before arriving at the Racecourse they had played 13 matches of which eight had been lost and five drawn. They had only managed to find the net on 14 occasions while conceding 41 goals. Indeed, the visitors were no match for the Welshmen and we could have won by a cricket score if the game had been played in less inclement conditions. A harsh wind and torrential rain led to Wrexham players taking their foot off the gas. We had recorded a four goal margin of victory, but it could have been so many more…

Writing the match report, Wrexham Leader journalist XYZ states that the “game was so one-sided that only a few brief details of the play are necessary”. Our first goal was scored after six minutes when a high centre from Gordon Gunson was converted by Billie Rogers. The Ashington defence were pulled apart by Roland Woodhouse and Gunson with visiting goalkeeper Ralph Ridley pulling off a number of fine saves before the Blues doubled their lead on 23 minutes. Archie Longmuir baffled the opposition with his wing work and when he centred, Cecil Smith took the ball in his stride to net his second goal of the season.

Just before half-time, Smith added a third that was vehemently disputed by the visitors who felt that both Woodhouse and Smith were offside. They managed to persuade the referee to consult his linesman, but this conversation only lasted a couple of seconds and the goal was awarded.

In the second half, Smith completed his hat-trick and this was followed by a degree of slackness edging in to our game. This led to Jimmy Randall taking advantage and getting on the scoresheet. Wrexham replied with a second goal for Rogers. The fact that they didn’t score more was clearly a source of frustration for XYZ who states that the Wrexham forwards could have scored a dozen goals and underlines the fact that “championships have been decided on goal average”. I hope a few Wrexham players of today are reading this…

Ashington benefitted from their football lesson at the Cae Ras as they ended their winless streak in their very next game – a 3-0 triumph against Tranmere Rovers at Portland Park.

Our quest for promotion fizzled out after Christmas and we finished the season in 11th position.

***

Blue-shirted Wrexham might have disappointed in the league but during 1927/28, they recorded their best run in the FA Cup up to that point. A crowd of 12,000 turned up at the Racecourse to see the third round encounter with Second Division Swansea Town. A fine 2-1 win ensured that the town was now gripped with Cup fever and this was heightened when we drew First Division Birmingham at home. A 12,228 crowd saw Wrexham go down fighting 1-3.

Wrexham council proposal must be scrapped

I am stressed beyond compare. Yesterday, I was stuck in a waste-of-time meeting all morning and I missed an important request from ITV Wales to be interviewed today for my opinions on the scandalous proposal by Wrexham council to introduce charges for Blue Badge car parking in the town centre.

More on this story can be read here:

BBC NEWS: Wrexham council planning charges for disabled parking

Unfortunately, ITV Wales missed the chance to speak to me, but they are not going to stop me from having my say on this blog and in letters to the local and national press.

Disabled people have been unfairly targeted by penny pinching local authorities and government for too long now. Wrexham council stand to make £25,000 per annum by introducing such charges to Blue Badge holders. This is a miniscule amount in the grand scheme of things, as it is not even as much as a weekly salary for a decent Premier League football player.

It will only serve to increase isolation and segregation. Many disabled people are already struggling to make ends meet and will be unable to afford extra parking charges. As far as I know, parking charges do not apply to the Chief Executive or his official minions at the council. Equality is a distant dream…

I would also like to remind the council of their legal duties under the Equality Act to avoid disproportionate impact through equality impact assessments. There are also numerous sources of information which tell us that disabled people are being hit disproportionately through ideological austerity, including reports from the European Human Rights Commission.

I, for one, would refuse on principle to pay for Blue Badge parking for the same reason I refuse to pay for the Care Call System that I used to have in my home. I needed this system due to my progressive, genetic disability, but I can no longer access this service as Wrexham Council unfairly decided to charge for a service that they know I need. Since having Care Call uninstalled I have had no option but to call the costly ambulance service on two occasions during the night time when I receive zero care or support.

Wrexham council have also threatened me with a reduction in my care hours should we lose the Welsh Independent Living Grant (WILG). This grant pays for my package of care along with Direct Payments from the council. Back in 2015, I was told that without WILG my hours of care and support would reduce from an already inadequate 86.5 hours per week to a totally useless 31 hours.

The actions of our Tory/Independent council deserve to be shared. You need to know what a repressive shower you’ve unwittingly elected and should not be distracted by new developments such as the soon-to-be-opened Arts Hub, while the homes and hungry freeze on our streets.

In the meantime, we can only keep fighting because at the end of the day, this is our multicultural town and community…

How to Lose Friends and Alienate People

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

Regular readers of this blog will know that I have put together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I will publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, utilising the team of illustrators I have assembled to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd in Mold, north Wales. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.


Use your silver spoon

To stir up old prejudice

Spread lies and divide

Power and fortune is yours

Eternal damnation waits…

The Independent: Toby Young’s appointment to board of higher education watchdog sparks criticism

Memory Match – 15-02-97

Throughout the 2017/18 football season I will be contributing to the Wrexham AFC matchday programme. I will be penning a feature called Memory Match, a look back at classic Wrexham games from the past that I will share in this blog over the coming months.

This is the third successive season that I have been writing the Memory Match column. Indeed, when I have written a Memory Match for every Football League season that Wrexham AFC enjoyed,  I would like to compile all the columns into a book that will reflect the rich history of my beloved football club.

15-02-97

Birmingham City v Wrexham

FA Cup Fourth Round

St Andrews

Result: 1-3

Birmingham City: Bennett, Brown, Johnson, Bruce, Ablett (Bowen), Holland, Devlin, Legg, Furlong, Horne, Limpar (Newell)

Goalscorer: Bruce (57)

Wrexham: Marriott, McGregor, Brace, Hughes, Humes, Carey, Chalk (Brammer), Russell, Connolly, Watkin, Ward

Goalscorers: Hughes (51), Humes (61), Connolly (90)

Attendance: 21,511

Cup fever hit Wrexham during the 1996/97 season, but if you told supporters that this would be the case after 66 minutes of our first round clash with Colwyn Bay at the Racecourse, few would have believed you. At the time we where trailing 0-1 and look to be heading for a humiliating exit. Thankfully, Bryan Hughes slammed home an equaliser after 76 minutes to force a replay, which we won 2-0.

Following this fortunate victory we never looked back. The second round saw Scunthorpe United take us to a replay after a 2-2 draw at the Racecourse. We finally dispatched the Ironmen after a 2-3 thriller at Glanford Park. The third round saw us entertain West Ham United on a snow covered pitch.  The match ended 1-1 and yet again we were involved in a replay.  A large Wrexham following saw Kevin Russell strike the only goal of the game as we marched on to the fourth round. After a 2-4 victory at London Road against Peterborough United we were drawn against Birmingham City at St Andrews.

Birmingham lost 3-0 at home to Portsmouth in Division One the previous weekend while Wrexham polished off Posh for the second time in a week at London Road thanks to the only goal of the game from Bryan Hughes.  We remained the underdogs, of course, but we wanted to avoid the humiliation we suffered on our last visit to St Andrews when we lost a Second Division game 5-2, the only bright spot of that afternoon was Gary Bennett’s 100th goal for the club.

On this occasion, Wrexham were not in the mood to crash out of the Cup after coming so far. In the early stages, their confident approach play was pinning the Blues back, but Steve Bruce marshalled the opposition defence with expertise and snuffed out any danger.

Bruce pushed forward for set pieces and actually opened the scoring for the home side on 37 minutes when he volleyed home a corner.

After weathering an early storm in the second half, our white-shirted heroes levelled when Bryan Hughes thumped home a header from a Peter Ward free-kick. Soon after, Paul Devlin was sent-off after a scandalous challenge on Martyn Chalk and the Town made full use of their extra man when Tony Hughes headed home a corner on 61 minutes.

City manager Trevor Francis introduced Jason Bowen and Mike Newell to the action in an attempt to force an equaliser but Wrexham defended deeply and forced a third in the final moments when Brian Carey found Karl Connolly with a delightful through ball. Winning the race with defender Michael Johnston, King Karl shot under the advancing goalkeeper – Ian Bennett – and the ball went in off the post.

We had reached the last eight of the FA Cup for the second time in our history.

“Despite going a goal behind, the players still had great belief in their own abilities and I was still confident that we would score,” said manager Brian Flynn.

“Our performance through the full match was all I could ask for and provided we were able to continue at that level, and then the chances were going to come. Once we got that equaliser, you felt there was only going to be one winner.

“It was probably our best display during my time as manager and to happen on such a stage was very satisfying.”

***

Our Cup run finally ground to a halt at the quarter-final stage with a humdrum 1-0 defeat against Chesterfield at Saltergate. This is still to painful to discuss as it was a case of being so close, yet so far…

 

 

You’re Never Going to Keep Me Down

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 150th poem of 2017 and I have now put together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I will publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, utilising the team of illustrators I have assembled to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd in Mold, north Wales. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.

Looks like you made it

Limping in at the finish

With your pride intact

Battered, betrayed and broken

Set to fight another day

Follow the Script

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 149th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson.

As well as the book, we are also planning an exhibition of my poetry in April in addition to the #SaveWILG exhibition – a collection of visual art, poetry and photographs produced by a number of artists across the UK, focusing on independent living as a whole. The exhibition will open on January 17th at 3pm in the Education Gallery at Theatr Clwyd. It will continue until January 29th. Please come to show your support for this campaign and enjoy the powerful and emotive art created by people with passion and determination that are united in the belief that disabled lives matter.

​Both of these events are being organised with the support of Disability Arts Cymru.

I, Nathan Davies

Can relate to your story

Of pure frustration

Held back by the damn system

Until the end credits roll