The End of the Tunnel…

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”?) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 79th Tanka poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, but I need an illustrator to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage. If you are a budding artist, or know of one, then please do get in touch.

I was planning on writing a Tanka each day, but I am not sure if I will achieve this. I am already two weeks behind schedule, which shows the pressures that disabled people face in modern society. I am also thinking that if I limit my Tanka’s to a couple a week then they might be of a higher standard. Anyway, here is my latest effort:

Driven to the brink

By men in expensive suits

Hacking and slashing

At our very social fabric.

Suicide can be painless

 

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One comment

  1. You are right to review where you are at with the tankas, Nathan.
    One a day was a very big task to set yourself. Nothing is set in tablets of stone and I do think it would be good to move to 2 per week.
    It needs to be a pleasure rather than a pressure. The best writing always expresses an authentic voice from the writer, and 2 strong, well crafted tankas a week would still give you plenty for a brilliant collection.
    Today’s tanka is really good, and displays your trademark honesty and frankness. It’s hard to comment on because of the suicide reference, but it is an important poem and you are doing incredibly well.

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