Memory Match – 13-01-51

Throughout the 2016/17 football season I will be contributing to the Wrexham AFC matchday programme. I will be penning a feature called Memory Match, a look back at classic Wrexham games from the past that I will share in this blog over the coming months.

13-01-51

Wrexham v York City

League Division Three (Northern Section)

Racecourse Ground

Result: 4-3

Wrexham: Ferguson, Tunney, McAdam, Spencer, Spruce, McCallum, Lawrence, Wylliie, Fidler, Donaldson, Tunnicliffe

Goalscorers: Tunnicliffe, Wylliie, Donaldson, Fidler

York City: Ashley, Andrews, Simpson, Horton, Brenen, Spence, Linaker, Brown, Patrick (A), Storey, Patrick (M)

Goalscorers: Patrick (Alf) (2), Spence (pen)

Attendance: 5,159

Wrexham began the 1950/51 season without a permanent manager, following the departure of Les McDowall to his beloved Manchester City after only one season in charge. This had been a season of struggle and caretaker Cliff Lloyd could only lead the Reds to an inconsistent start to the new term. The high points of his stewardship up until November included home victories over Shrewsbury Town (1-0) and Chester City (2-0).

Peter Jackson was eventually unveiled as the new manager after we had endured a run of only one win in nine games under Lloyd. Jackson’s mission was to steady the ship and it could be argued that this was achieved with an anonymous 14th place finish in a newly expanded 24-team League.

This was Jackson’s fourth home game, having won two others and drawing one. With York City struggling for form it was hoped that our new boss could extend his unbeaten record at the Racecourse.

It took 20 minutes for Wrexham to open the scoring when Cyril Lawrence delivered a corner to the unmarked Billy Tunnicliffe who didn’t need asking twice to put the Reds in the lead. Frank Fidler had a chance to increase the lead with a flashing header, but it was the visitors who struck next on the half-hour. Alf Patrick made the most of Wrexham’s defensive shortcomings to equalise, albeit totally against the run of play.

It didn’t take the home side long to reassert their dominance though. Again it was a Lawrence corner kick that proved decisive, but this time it was Jimmy Wyllie who provided the finishing header. There was still time before the interval for Wrexham to increase their lead further. Fidler was unfortunate to see his header parried against the crossbar by Joe Ashley in the York goal, but the ball came down in play and Les Donaldson’s over-head kick secured our advantage going into the break. The only wonder was that York weren’t further behind.

The second half continued in much the same vein with Wrexham battering away at a defence that could not cope with the onslaught. Seven minutes after the re-start Fidler nodded in a Tunnicliffe cross to score his side’s fourth. Game over, or was it?

Whether it was a case of Wrexham becoming complacent or York digging deep to fight back is a moot point. Writing in the Leader, “Wanderer” complained about “Wrexham’s half-backs wandering hither and thither until all we could rely on was Eddie Tunney like the rock of Gibraltar crashing in and clearing when everyone else seemed unable to put a foot right”.

The Minstermen found their way back into the game thanks to an error of judgement from Wrexham goalkeeper Archie Ferguson. Matt Patrick delivered a corner that a poorly placed Ferguson could only watch sail over his head to his unmarked brother Alf, who was on hand to reduce the deficit for the final half-hour.

On 77 minutes disaster struck when Wrexham conceded a penalty following a “stupid push”. It was probably a harsh decision, but Ron Spence made no mistake from the penalty spot. This led to an uncomfortabl00e last 10 minutes, but had Wrexham increased their lead it would not have been an unfair result based on the overall standards of the two teams.

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