Feel the Sentiment

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 132nd poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are interested in collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson. Samples of their work can be found by clicking on their names. There are other artists involved but I do not have links to their work at the moment. I hope to rectify this soon.


Congratulations

Conveyed through gritted teeth

You start a journey

While I stand still, stagnated

Dreaming of what might have been…

 

 

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Keep Banging the Door

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 131st poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are interested in collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson. Samples of their work can be found by clicking on their names. There are other artists involved but I do not have links to their work at the moment. I hope to rectify this soon.

The back of the queue

Is a lonely place to be

Waiting for someone

A round hole for my square peg

An impossibly hard fit

Memory Match – 26-01-52

Throughout the 2017/18 football season I will be contributing to the Wrexham AFC matchday programme. I will be penning a feature called Memory Match, a look back at classic Wrexham games from the past that I will share in this blog over the coming months.

This is the third successive season that I have been writing the Memory Match column. Indeed, when I have written a Memory Match for every Football League season that Wrexham AFC enjoyed,  I would like to compile all the columns into a book that will reflect the rich history of my beloved football club.

 

26-01-52

Rochdale v Wrexham

League Division Three (Northern Section)

Spotland

Rochdale: Nicholls, Watson, Radford, Lynn, Downes, Buchan, Whitworth, Tomlinson, Middlebrough, Foulds, Betts

Goalscorer: Buchan

Wrexham: Connor, Wynn, Fisher, Jones, Spruce, Tapscott, Lawrence, Hewitt, Bannan, Hope, Tunnicliffe

Goalscorers: Hope (3), Hewitt, Bannan

Attendance: 4,244

Season 1951/52 started in a nightmare fashion with the Town losing all of their opening six matches, including an opening day defeat at Sealand Road against Chester (2-1). This awful start to the season continued with defeats against Barrow (3-1), Chesterfield (0-3), Barrow (2-4), Bradford Park Avenue (5-0) and Workington (2-0). We finally won our seventh match of the campaign after beating Halifax Town (2-1) at the Racecourse. There was only a slight improvement as the season went on with the team lifting themselves to a disappointing 18th position.

Our last game of January 1952 actually came on the back of two successive home victories against Grimsby Town (2-0) and Mansfield Town (3-1), but we had yet to win on the road all season. The only glimmer of hope was that Rochdale were also enduring a season of struggle in the lower reaches of the league table.

This contest was played in atrocious conditions as the afternoon saw dense freezing fog and the pitch at Spotland was covered with snow, which frost had hardened. Writing in the Leader, the “Wanderer” said that these conditions actually paved the way to Wrexham’s success as they passed the ball around well and adapted to the conditions much better than Rochdale. Once the Reds took an early lead they never looked back.

After six minutes play, Eric Hope drove home the opening goal from a George Jones free kick. Rochdale had their moments and equalised after 20 minute when Alistair Buchan fired home a long-range drive. Robert Connor dived and appeared to have the ball covered, but it was deflected into the other corner of the net by Ron Wynn. Our custodian Connor was largely a spectator for the remainder of the afternoon as he was only really tested from a second half corner, from which Alan Middlebrough struck the crossbar.

Wrexham were back in the lead after a Billy Tunnicliffe cross was parried by a defender and the ball fell into the path of the ruthless Hope. More was to follow before half time as on 37 minutes, captain Cyril Lawrence – playing against his former club – swung over a glorious corner and Hewitt converted it into the net before goalkeeper Jim Nicholls could move.

After the interval, Peter Jackson’s men continued to power forward in search of more goals. Indeed, it came as no surprise when Lawrence whipped in a cross for Hope to slam home a 25 yard thunderbolt. Lawrence was playing the game of his life and turned the Rochdale left back, Arthur Radford, inside out with his trickery.  It was a shame that he didn’t get on the scoresheet himself but he could be proud that he had a hand in three of the goals.

Hope also deserves a special mention as “he worked like a Trojan and whenever the ball came his way it was whirled away with the speed of a rocket without a second’s hesitation. It was from three such shots that he got his goals”.

Wrexham completed their third win in succession when Lawrence, once again, sent in a centre that Tommy Bannan connected with.

This remained Wrexham’s only away win of an arduous season, while Rochdale finished the campaign in 21st position – only the bottom two clubs, Workington and Darlington, had to seek re-election.

***

Unfortunately, we did not progress very far in the cup competitions. We did put Halifax Town to the sword (3-0) in the first round of the FA Cup, but we were knocked out at the second round stage by Leyton Orient (3-2), after a replay.

After beating Colwyn Bay and Chester in the Welsh Cup, we were beaten at the semi-final stage by Merthyr Tydfil (0-2).

Badges and an update #SaveWILG

Its all go with the #SaveWILG campaign. I now have Save WILG badges available at £1 each to help fundraise for the cause. There are many costs involved with running such a campaign as we are planning to stage fundraising events, print leaflets and stage an art exhibition about the importance of independent living for disabled people.

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If anyone would like to support the campaign by purchasing and wearing a badge please get in touch with me via the contact page or on Twitter or Facebook.

I would like to ask my friends at Disabled People Against Cuts if they would like to create any submissions of artwork, in any form, for the planned exhibition  at  Theatr Clwyd in Mold, North Wales during the week beginning January 16th, 2018.

I am hoping to frame many of my postcard photographs for the exhibition so I am also asking as many of you as possible to post with one of my Save WILG postcards and agree to take part in the exhibition. If you have already posed for a picture then you can ask your friends or family members to do the same. I really want to push this and show the depth of support for this campaign that is out there.

There will be more updates in the near future with plenty of exciting events in the pipeline as we attend to salvage independent living for all disabled people.

Thanks for your support.

 

 

Reality Bites

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 130th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are interested in collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson. Samples of their work can be found by clicking on their names. There are other artists involved but I do not have links to their work at the moment. I hope to rectify this soon.

Good morning ladies

Welcome to my private room

Peel off my bed sheets

Time to get down and dirty

Ease my accidental shame…

The Theme Tune from M*A*S*H

According to Wikipedia, Tanka (短歌, “short poem”) is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.

A Tanka consists of 5 lines and 31 syllables. Each line has a set number of syllables see below:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

This is my 129th poem of 2017 and I am well on my way to putting together a collection of poems to reflect the struggles of disabled people in 21st century Britain. I would like to publish these poems in a book to be released in 2018, and I am close to finding a team of illustrators to help me add images to my words and create the type of book that I envisage.  I am speaking with students from Glyndwr University who are interested in collaborating with me on this exciting project. Two of the talented artists who have agreed to illustrate my work are Julie Rogers-Owen and Heather Wilson. Samples of their work can be found by clicking on their names. There are other artists involved but I do not have links to their work at the moment. I hope to rectify this soon.

A  broken record

Screaming into the darkness

Until its too late

You could’ve made a difference-

Now wrestle with your conscience

Honorary Fellowship

It has been a crazy few days as I have been receiving a lot of attention and praise after receiving an Honorary Fellowship from Glyndwr University for my work in Disability Rights.

Of course, I am indebted to a number of people who have provided me with unflinching support and assistance as I do my best to keep fighting for justice for all disabled people these difficult times.

I was honoured to receive a glowing introduction by Liz Lefroy, Senior Lecturer in Social Work at Glyndwr University. I have included a transcript of her speech below:

Passion drives Nathan Lee Davies.  Passion as an author, passion as a poet, and passion as a political activist who is heavily involved in our local community. He lobbies on behalf of those whose voices are often not heard, and he does so with humour, compassion and fortitude.

It is clear that despite a diagnosis at the age of 15 of Friedreich’s Ataxia – a progressive, genetic disease of the nervous system – Nathan is a determined and driven individual who has let nothing stop him from achieving his goals and ambitions. 

He graduated from the University of Nottingham, achieving a BA (Hons) in American Studies; and spent 6 months as an exchange student at the University of Illinois, travelling extensively across the country. 

 He is an enthusiastic supporter of Wrexham AFC, sitting on the Club’s Disabled Supporters Association Committee and writing a regular column for the match day programme. Nathan has also written a book about his experience of visiting every football ground in Wales from the perspective of a person who uses a wheelchair. “Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud” is on the reading list of Glyndwr University’s BA (Hons) Social Work programme.

Away from football, Nathan has a keen interest in politics and can often be found fighting for social justice through his work with Disabled People Against Cuts, the Care and Social Services Inspectorate for Wales, the FDF Centre for Independent Living, Disability Wales and the Outside In Forum attached to the BA Social Work programme at the University where he gives talks to students on his expertise through experience.

Nathan is being recognised for his own achievements today, but he also represents Outside In, whose tireless work in the School of Social and Life Sciences is deeply appreciated by students and lecturers. He represents those in Wrexham and across Wales for whom he advocates and campaigns.  He represents all of us who believe in the rights of every citizen to be heard and respected.

Nathan is being honoured for his services to disability rights.

A live stream of the graduation ceremony was broadcast online, a copy of which can be seen below:

 

Of course, I am my own worst critic. Everyone says that I gave a good speech, but I know deep down I could have said more. One thing that I really wish I had mentioned was the fact that I would like to dedicate my recognition to a true mentor of mine who sadly passed away earlier this year. Mr Brian Thirsk was a true gentleman and inspired me to carry on my fight for justice for all disabled people. I wrote a Tanka for him after his passing:

True inspiration

You instilled confidence

Provided fresh hope

Wrapped inside pure Welsh humour

Future fights are in your name

it was a truly memorable day that continued in the evening with a celebration at the Centenary Club attended by approximately 60 guests.

Below are some photographs to mark the occasion: